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Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of opioid and psychostimulant drugs

Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of opioid and psychostimulant drugs

  1. Gradient
    Brain Research Reviews 2008 Jun;58(1):192-208

    Cunha-Oliveira T, Rego AC, Oliveira CR

    Abstract: Substance abuse and addiction are the most costly of all the neuropsychiatric disorders. In the last decades, much progress has been achieved in understanding the effects of the drugs of abuse in the brain. However, efficient treatments that prevent relapse have not been developed. Drug addiction is now considered a brain disease, because the abuse of drugs affects several brain functions. Neurological impairments observed in drug addicts may reflect drug-induced neuronal dysfunction and neurotoxicity. The drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neurotransmitter systems, particularly dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons. This review explores the literature reporting cellular and molecular alterations reflecting the cytotoxicity induced by amphetamines, cocaine and opiates in neuronal systems. The neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse are often associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inhibition of neurogenesis, among other mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie brain dysfunction observed in drug-addicted individuals may contribute to improve the treatment of drug addiction, which may have social and economic consequences. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.