1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Cocaethylene: a unique cocaine metabolite displays high affinity for the dopamine transporter. (1991

Cocaethylene: a unique cocaine metabolite displays high affinity for the dopamine transporter. (1991

  1. Calliope
    Journal of Neurochemistry. 1991;56(2):698-701.

    W L Hearn; D D Flynn; G W Hime; S Rose; J C Cofino; E Mantero-Atienza; C V Wetli; D C Mash (Profiled Author: Deborah C. Mash) Comprehensive Drug Research Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Florida 33141.

    Abstract
    Concurrent cocaine and alcohol use is common practice in the general population, as indicated by recent prevalence studies. In the presence of ethyl alcohol, cocaine is metabolized to its ethyl homolog, cocaethylene. The transesterification of cocaine and ethanol to cocaethylene takes place in the liver and represents a novel metabolic reaction. Cocaethylene was detected in postmortem blood, liver, and neurological tissues in concentrations equal to and sometimes exceeding those of cocaine. In vitro binding studies demonstrate that cocaethylene has a pharmacological profile similar but not identical to that of cocaine at monoamine transport sites assayed in the human brain. Cocaethylene was equipotent to cocaine at inhibiting [3H]mazindol binding to the dopamine transporter. The blockade of dopamine reuptake in the synaptic cleft by cocaethylene may account for the enhanced euphoria associated with combined alcohol and cocaine abuse.