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Confounders of the Relation between Type of Alcohol and Cardiovascular Disease (2007)

Confounders of the Relation between Type of Alcohol and Cardiovascular Disease (2007)

  1. Salvinorin A
    Annals of Epidemiology 2007:S13–S15

    Morten Grønbæk

    There have been numerous reports from epidemiologic studies showing that moderate drinkers have lower rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than do those who drink heavily or not at all. A number of scientific reports from scientists around the world suggest confounding may play a role in the reported beneficial health effects associated with moderate drinking. Among potentially confounding variables for these reported associations are the frequency of alcohol consumption, drinking pattern (steady or binge drinking), type of beverage, and differences in the pattern of drinking associated with different types of beverages. In some papers, individuals who report primarily wine consumption have been shown to be at lower risk of CVD and total mortality, and there is evidence for greater beneficial effects from more frequent, regular drinking. However, other potential confounders include better cognitive function, higher socioeconomic status, better subjective health, and a healthier diet, including food purchases, all of which are more common in regular drinkers and wine drinkers. Thus, the question of whether the beneficial effects of beverage types differ, with additional benefits for wine, remains unresolved.