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Ecstasy Use Among College Undergraduates: Gender, Race and Sexual Identity (2003)

Ecstasy Use Among College Undergraduates: Gender, Race and Sexual Identity (2003)

  1. Jatelka
    Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2003 Apr;24(3):209-15

    Boyd CJ, McCabe SE , d'Arcy H.

    We examined a random sample (N=3606) of undergraduates at one large midwestern university and explored correlates of ecstasy use and how use varied by gender, race, and sexual identity. Approximately 10% of the sample used ecstasy in their lifetime; 7% had used within the past year and 3% within the past month. Ecstasy was the second most likely illicit drug to be used, marijuana being the first. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that while men and women were equally likely to have used ecstasy, excessive partying, sexual identity, and grade point average were strongly correlated with ecstasy use. After adjusting for several factors, the number of sexual partners increased the likelihood of ecstasy use, as did self-reported sexual identity; gay, lesbian, and bisexual students were more than two times as likely to have used ecstasy in the past year. Significant relationships existed between ecstasy use and other substance use such as binge drinking, marijuana use, and cigarette smoking. Implications for interventions are discussed.
    PMID: 12810141 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]