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Effects of Various Serotonin Agonists, Antagonists and Uptake Inhibitors on the Discriminative Stimu

Effects of Various Serotonin Agonists, Antagonists and Uptake Inhibitors on the Discriminative Stimu

  1. Jatelka
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Theraputics 1999 Oct;291(1):239-50

    Munzar P, Laufert MD, Kutkat SW, Nováková J, Goldberg SR.

    Neurochemical studies indicate that methamphetamine increases central serotonin (5-HT) levels more markedly than other psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine or cocaine. In the present study, we investigated 5-HT involvement in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. In Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg methamphetamine i.p. from saline under a fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation, the effects of selected 5-HT agonists, antagonists, and uptake inhibitors were tested. Fluoxetine (1.8-18.0 mg/kg) and clomipramine (3.0-18.0 mg/kg), selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, did not produce any methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects when administered alone, but fluoxetine (5.6 mg/kg), unlike clomipramine (5.6 mg/kg), significantly shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left. Both 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (0.03-0.56 mg/kg), a full agonist, and buspirone (1.0-10.0 mg/kg), a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) receptors, partially generalized to the training dose of methamphetamine but only at high doses that decreased response rate. This generalization was antagonized by the coadministration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg). WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg) also partially reversed the leftward shift of the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. (+/-)-1-(2, 5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (0.3 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist, shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left, and this leftward shift was antagonized by the coadministration of ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) antagonist. Ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg) also produced a shift to the right in the methamphetamine dose-response curve and completely reversed the leftward shift in the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. In contrast, tropisetron (1.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(3) antagonist, produced a shift to the left of the methamphetamine dose-response curve, and this effect of tropisetron was antagonized by the coadministration of m-chlorophenyl-biguanide (1.8 mg/kg), a 5-HT(3) agonist. The present data suggest that the 5-HT system plays a modulatory role in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. These effects appear to be mediated through 5-HT release and blockade of reuptake and subsequent activation of 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors, with limited involvement of other 5-HT receptor subtypes.