1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Influence of Environmental Context on Tolerance to LSD-Induced Behaviour in Primates (1986)

Influence of Environmental Context on Tolerance to LSD-Induced Behaviour in Primates (1986)

  1. Jatelka
    Biol Psychiatry. 1986 Mar;21(3):314-17

    Schlemmer, R.Francis ; Nawara, Carol ; Heinze, William J. ; Davis, John M. ; Advokat, Claire


    Traditional theories of drug tolerance and de­pendence have generally stressed the physio­logical consequences of chronic drug adminis­tation. However. substantial evidence indicates that environmental contingencies exert profound effects on drug action. It ha become increas­ingly clear that the behavioral outcome of chronic pharmacological stimulation is a function of both the characteristics of the drug and the context in which the drug is given ( Siegel 1979: Poulos et al. t 981: Eikelboom and Stewart t 982: De­mellweek and Goudie 1983) Contextual influences have been particularly welt characterized with respect to central ner­vous system depressant. primarily opiates. al­cohol. and sedative-hypnotics. However. such modulation is not limited to these drug classes. Both addictive as well as nonaddictive agents (e.g .. haloperidol) (Poulos and Hinson 1982) have been found to be susceptible to contextual modulation.
    One class of drugs that has not previously been examined in this regard is the hallucinogens. A rapid partial tolerance develops to the hallucinogenic effect of most hallucinogens, no­tably d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). As yet the mechanism responsible for this toler­ance is unknown.