1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Investigating the Association Between Moderate Drinking and Mental Health

Investigating the Association Between Moderate Drinking and Mental Health

  1. Salvinorin A
    Nady El-Guebaly
    Annals of Epidemiology 2007;17:S55–S62

    Abstract

    In an attempt to relate “moderate drinking” to “mental health,” inadequacies of definition for both terms become apparent. Moderate drinking can be variously defined by a certain number of drinks to “nonintoxicating” to “noninjurious” to “optimal,” whereas mental health definitions range from “the absence of psychopathology” to “positive psychology” to “subjective well-being.” Nevertheless, we evaluated the relation by conducting an electronic search of the literature from 1980 onwards using the terms “moderate drinking,” “moderate alcohol consumption,” “mental health,” and “quality of life.”
    Most studies report a “J-shaped curve,” with positive self-reports of subjective mental health associated with moderate drinking but not with heavier drinking. The relevance of expectancies has been unevenly acknowledged, and studies on the cultural differences among expectancies are largely lacking. The potential role of moderate drinking in stress reduction and studies of social integration have yielded inconsistent results as previous levels of drinking, age, social isolation, and other factors have often not been adequately controlled. Future anthropological, epidemiological, and pharmacological interactions preferably must be studied through a prospective design and with better definitions of moderate drinking and mental health.