1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Is Ecstasy (MDMA) Perceived to be Safe? A Critical Survey (2004)

Is Ecstasy (MDMA) Perceived to be Safe? A Critical Survey (2004)

  1. Jatelka
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence

    Alex Gammaa,∗, Lisa Jeromeb, Matthias E. Liechtic, Harry R. Sumnall

    Abstract
    Recent publications claim that the recreational drug ecstasy is considered to be safe by many or most ecstasy users, or by young people or the general public. Unfortunately, there are no references that provide any support for this claim. Previous studies of various populations, including drug users and adolescents in several nations, also failed to support claims of the perceived safety of ecstasy. Epidemiological surveys from the USA and UK consistently report high proportions of young people who perceive great risk in using ecstasy. Studies in
    ecstasy users show that they are aware of a number of short- and long-term risks of ecstasy use, although, in the absence of actual problems,
    they evaluate the personal significance of these risks as low. This study further investigated the perceived harmfulness of ecstasy, drawing on an online survey of over 900 drug users. Little support for the claim was found. Seventy-three percent of the participants in the online survey viewed ecstasy as carrying at least ‘some risk’. The claim of ecstasy’s perceived safety is plausibly based on researchers’ assumptions that the continued widespread use of the drug indicates that users are unaware of the associated risks, and that informing them about these risks would lead to a reduction in drug use.We argue that these assumptions are inadequate and that drug information and harm reduction strategies
    should focus on more affective and personally significant aspects of risk perception.
Tags: