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Lifting The Veil: A Review of the History, Clinical-Usage and Safety of LSD, Ibogaine and MDMA in a

Lifting The Veil: A Review of the History, Clinical-Usage and Safety of LSD, Ibogaine and MDMA in a

  1. Jatelka
    Christopher Lovett, November 1999

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is yet another compound with a long and circuitous history as a psychotherapeutic adjunct. MDMA is the N-methylated congener of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), a popular street-drug and psychotherapeutic agent of the late 1960s. MDA, also known as the "Hug Drug" or "Mellow Drug of America" within the 1960s counter-culture, has been described as enhancing feelings of well-being, empathy, insight and self-awareness while decreasing levels of anxiety and emotional inhibition (Perrine, 1996). For these effects, MDA has been used during psychotherapy to help facilitate the expression and integration of meaningful, disturbing emotional content that a patient might be chronically experiencing and dwelling upon (e.g., Naranjo, 1973; Stolaroff, 1997; Yensen, et al., 1976). Andrew Weil has also reported an increase in muscular coordination with MDA: "I have also tried things like rock climbing and swimming after taking MDA and again find that my body works in a more coordinated, smoother fashion and that I can do things with it that I usually cannot," (Weil, 1976: pg. 335). Also, in contrast to LSD which seems to 'demand' inner exploration, MDA has been reported to be more gentle in 'inviting' introspection (Yensen, et al., 1976).