1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Molecular Biology of the Enzymes that Degrade Endocannabinoids

Molecular Biology of the Enzymes that Degrade Endocannabinoids

  1. Anonymous
    Robyn A. Puffenbarger
    Current Drug Targets - CNS & Neurological Disorders, 2005, 4, 625-631

    Endocannabinoid circuits have been shown to regulate a number of important pathways including pain,
    feeding, memory and motor coordination. Direct manipulation of endocannabinoid tone, therefore, may relieve disease
    symptoms related to analgesia, obesity, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in humans. The endocannabinoid circuit involves
    two cloned receptors: CB1 in the CNS and CB2 in the periphery; endogenously produced ligands including anandamide,
    2-arachidonylglycerol and palmitoylethanolamide; and enzymes that degrade endocannabinoid ligands to terminate
    signaling. Currently, three enzymes have been characterized with the ability to hydrolyze endocannabinoids: fatty acid
    amide hydrolase (FAAH), monoglyceride lipase (MGL) and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). The
    purpose of this review is to examine the molecular biology for the enzymes that hydrolyze endocannabinoids covering the
    protein activity and expression, mRNA characterization, genomic locus organization, promoter analysis and knockout
    phenotypes.