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Neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on visual event-related potential (P300): a compa

Neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on visual event-related potential (P300): a compa

  1. Bajeda
    MONTENEGRO, Mariana; VEIGA, Heloisa; DESLANDES, Andréa et al. (2005). Neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on visual event-related potential (P300): a comparative study. Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr., vol.63, no.2b, p.410-415.

    The P300 component of the event-related potential (ERP) is a general measurement of "cognitive efficiency". It is an index of the ability of an individual's central nervous system (CNS) to process incoming information.

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on the visual ERP (P300), in relation to a P300 normative database.

    METHOD: 15 right-handed individuals (7 male and 8 female), between 20 and 30 years of age, healthy, free of any cognitive impairment and not making use of psychoactive substances were studied. Participants were submitted to a visual discrimination task, which employed the "oddball" paradigm, after the administration of caffeine and bromazepam, in a randomized, double-blind design.

    RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were observed when the caffeine and bromazepam conditions were compared to the normative database.

    CONCLUSION: The present results suggest that caffeine and bromazepam have distinct modulatory effects on CNS functioning.