1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Neuropharmacological effects of the aqueous extract of Nauclea latifolia root bark in rats and mice

Neuropharmacological effects of the aqueous extract of Nauclea latifolia root bark in rats and mice

  1. BitterSweet
    S. Amos, J. Abbah, B. Chindo, I. Edmond, L. Binda, B. Adzu, S. Buhari, A.A. Odutola, C. Wambebe, K. Gamaniel, Neuropharmacological effects of the aqueous extract of Nauclea latifolia root bark in rats and mice, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Volume 97, Issue 1, 10 February 2005, Pages 53-57, ISSN 0378-8741, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2004.10.003.
    (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874104005100)

    Abstract
    The present study evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of the aqueous extract of Nauclea latifolia root bark in rodents. Effects on the spontaneous motor activity (SMA), exploratory behaviour, pentobarbital sleeping time, apomorphine-induced stereotypic behaviour and motor coordination (rota-rod performance) were investigated. The extract (50–200 mg/kg p.o.) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the SMA and exploratory behaviour in mice and prolonged pentobarbital sleeping time in rats dose-dependently. The extract also remarkably attenuated the intensity of apomorphine-induced stereotypy dose-dependently in mice, but had no effect on motor coordination as determined by the performance on rota-rod. These results indicate the presence of psychoactive substances in the aqueous extract of the root bark of Nauclea latifolia