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Neuropharmacological Studies of Phencyclidine (PCP)-Induced Behavioral Stimulation in Mice (1980)

Neuropharmacological Studies of Phencyclidine (PCP)-Induced Behavioral Stimulation in Mice (1980)

  1. Bajeda
    Psychopharmacology 1980;71(3):291-7.

    Freed WJ (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Weinberger DR (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Bing LA (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Wyatt RJ (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus).

    A variety of drugs were screened to determine which were capable of blocking the behavioral stimulation produced in mice by acute administration of phencyclidine (PCP). Chlorpromazine and clozapine blocked PCP-induced stimulation, while haloperidol, reserpine, and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine did not. The GABA receptor agonists imidazole acetic acid and muscimol blocked PCP, but other drugs that influence GABA, such as dipropylacetic acid, baclofen, and diazepam, were ineffective. Yohimbine and methysergide also blocked PCP in high dosages, but other drugs with comparable alpha-noradrenergic and serotonergic blocking properties (phentolamine, cyproheptadine, and cinnanserin) were ineffective. Cholinergic and anticholinergic drugs, beta-noradrenergic and opiate antagonists and nonspecific sedatives and convulsants were also ineffective. These findings suggest that chlorpromazine, clozapine, yohimbine, and methysergide may share a property that is unlike their primary known modes of action on dopaminergic, alpha-noradrenergic, and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems, and that this property accounts for their ability to block PCP. However, the effectiveness of GABA agonists appears to be mediated through direct activation of GABA receptors. It is suggested that chlorpromazine and imidazole acetic acid should be considered as possible drug treatments for PCP toxicity.