1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

New medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence

New medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence

  1. Guigz
    Ann Ist Super Sanità 2009 | Vol. 45, No. 2: 109-115.
    Kyle M. Kampman
    School of Medicine and Treatment Research Center, University of Pennsylvania, USA.


    Cocaine dependence continues to be a significant public health problem in the United
    States and in Europe. Regular cocaine use has not declined significantly in the United States since
    1992 and has been rising in the European Union. Although counseling remains the treatment of
    choice for cocaine dependence, many cocaine dependent patients do not respond completely to drug
    counseling. Therefore, the development of effective medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence
    is a research priority. Progress in the understanding of the neurobiology of cocaine dependence
    has led to the discovery of several promising medications that have already shown encouraging
    results in controlled clinical trials. Other promising compounds are just now becoming available
    for clinical trials. Among the medications in clinical trials, modafinil may be helpful in promoting
    an initial period of stable abstinence. For the prevention of relapse, medications that block cocaine
    euphoria or reduce cocaine craving have shown promise. Potential relapse-prevention medications
    include disulfiram and GABAergic medications such as gamma-vinyl GABA, tiagabine and topiramate.
    Finally, a vaccine capable of stimulating the production of cocaine specific antibodies has shown
    promise in preliminary studies for the prevention of relapse to cocaine use. Newer medications not
    yet included in clinical trials, but promising nonetheless, include: dopamine D3 receptor antagonists,
    neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists, and n-acetylcysteine.