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NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses

NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses

  1. chaos69
    NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses
    Anita E. Autry, Megumi Adachi, Elena Nosyreva, Elisa S. Na, Maarten F. Los, Peng-fei Cheng, Ege T. Kavalali & Lisa M. Monteggia

    Nature 475, 91–95 (07 July 2011) doi:10.1038/nature10130
    Received 25 October 2010 Accepted 21 April 2011 Published online 15 June 2011


    Clinical studies consistently demonstrate that a single sub-psychomimetic dose of ketamine, an ionotropic glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) antagonist, produces fast-acting antidepressant responses in patients suffering from major depressive disorder, although the underlying mechanism is unclear1, 2, 3. Depressed patients report the alleviation of major depressive disorder symptoms within two hours of a single, low-dose intravenous infusion of ketamine, with effects lasting up to two weeks1, 2, 3, unlike traditional antidepressants (serotonin re-uptake inhibitors), which take weeks to reach efficacy. This delay is a major drawback to current therapies for major depressive disorder and faster-acting antidepressants are needed, particularly for suicide-risk patients3. The ability of ketamine to produce rapidly acting, long-lasting antidepressant responses in depressed patients provides a unique opportunity to investigate underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that ketamine and other NMDAR antagonists produce fast-acting behavioural antidepressant-like effects in mouse models, and that these effects depend on the rapid synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. We find that the ketamine-mediated blockade of NMDAR at rest deactivates eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinase (also called CaMKIII), resulting in reduced eEF2 phosphorylation and de-suppression of translation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, we find that inhibitors of eEF2 kinase induce fast-acting behavioural antidepressant-like effects. Our findings indicate that the regulation of protein synthesis by spontaneous neurotransmission may serve as a viable therapeutic target for the development of fast-acting antidepressants.