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Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of depressed mood among female methamphetamine users (2007)

Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of depressed mood among female methamphetamine users (2007)

  1. Jatelka
    Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 2007 Nov;Suppl 4:353-66

    Semple SJ (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Zians J (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Strathdee SA (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Patterson TL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus).

    Female methamphetamine (meth) users report more depressive symptoms than do males. This study examined psychosocial and behavioral correlates of depressed mood in 146 heterosexual, meth-using women in San Diego, CA. Sixty percent met Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) criteria for moderate to severe depressive symptoms (i.e., higher levels of depressive symptoms); 40% had minimal to mild depressive symptoms (i.e., lower levels of depressive symptoms). The two groups were compared on background characteristics, reasons for meth use, patterns of meth use, psychosocial factors, social and sexual consequences of meth use, and sexual risk behavior. Women with higher levels of depressive symptoms were less likely to be employed, were more likely to use meth to cope with mood, used more grams of meth in a 30-day period, used meth more times per day on a greater number of consecutive days, and were more likely to be binge users of meth. They also scored lower on a measure of self-esteem and higher on measures of impulsivity, social stigma, and social network members' use of meth. In multivariate analyses, lower self-esteem and higher ratings of social network members' use of meth were significant predictors of higher levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial and behavioral factors are discussed in terms of treatment protocols for mood regulation and meth abatement in the target population