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Ranitidine does not alter adinazolam pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics

Ranitidine does not alter adinazolam pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics

  1. Anonymous
    J Clin Psychopharmacol. 1992 Aug;12(4):282-7.
    Suttle AB, Songer SS, Dukes GE, Hak LJ, Koruda M, Fleishaker JC, Brouwer KL.

    Abstract

    Adinazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine with anxiolytic and antidepressant activity. Adinazolam is metabolized extensively; the major metabolite, N-desmethyladinazolam (NDMAD), possesses significant pharmacologic activity. NDMAD is eliminated predominantly by renal excretion. Ranitidine, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, is also excreted renally and may compete with NDMAD for renal secretion. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of ranitidine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of adinazolam and NDMAD. In a randomized, cross-over study, 12 healthy male volunteers received 300 mg of ranitidine orally followed by 30 mg of adinazolam 1 hour later (treatment A), or adinazolam alone (treatment B). Pharmacodynamic alterations were assessed using card sorting, digit-symbol substitution, and short-term memory tests. Venous blood samples were obtained over 24 hours for analysis of adinazolam and NDMAD by high-performance liquid chromatography. Urine samples also were collected and analyzed for NDMAD. No significant difference in adinazolam oral clearance (1,149 vs. 1,135 ml/hr/kg) was noted between treatments (A vs. B, respectively). Furthermore, the renal clearance of NDMAD (196 vs. 198 ml/min) and the cumulative urinary excretion of NDMAD (% dose; 61.2 vs. 62.3) were not significantly different. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated no significant differences in psychomotor performance or short-term memory between treatments. Results suggest that ranitidine has no effect on adinazolam disposition, NDMAD renal clearance, or the central nervous system effects mediated by the drug.