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Rapid Delivery of Nicotine Promotes Behavioural Sensitization and Alters its Neurobiological Impact

Rapid Delivery of Nicotine Promotes Behavioural Sensitization and Alters its Neurobiological Impact

  1. Jatelka
    Biological Psychiatry, 2005, Vol.57(4), pp.351-360

    Samaha, Anne-Noël ; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy ; Yang, Pengwei ; Robinson, Terry E.

    Background
    Nicotine is highly addictive when it is inhaled from tobacco smoke, whereas nicotine replacement products, which usually deliver nicotine orally or transdermally, rarely lead to addiction. It has been proposed that this is due in part to differences in the rate of nicotine delivery to the brain under the two conditions. However, the mechanism by which rapid nicotine delivery facilitates the transition to addiction is not known. The ability of drugs to alter gene regulation and to produce sensitization has been implicated in addiction. We hypothesized, therefore, that varying the rate of nicotine administration may modulate its ability to elicit this form of plasticity.
    Methods
    Animals were treated with repeated intravenous infusions of nicotine over 5, 25, or 100 sec, and their locomotor responses were monitored over treatment days.
    Results
    We found that increasing the rate of intravenous nicotine infusion potentiated its ability to produce locomotor sensitization, and to induce c-fos and arc mRNA expression in mesocorticolimbic structures.
    Conclusions
    We suggest that rapid administration may increase vulnerability to addiction by altering the neurobiological impact of nicotine and promoting a form of neurobehavioral plasticity (i.e., sensitization) that can lead to pathological incentive motivation for drugs.