1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Relation Between Blood and Urine Amphetamine Concentrations in Impaired Drivers, as Influenced by Ur

Relation Between Blood and Urine Amphetamine Concentrations in Impaired Drivers, as Influenced by Ur

  1. Jatelka
    Human & experimental toxicology 2005, Vol.24(12), pp.615-22

    Jones and Karlsson

    Abstract
    Amphetamine undergoes extensive renal excretion and significant amounts are present in urine as the unchanged parent drug. This prompted us to investigate whether a quantitative relationship existed between blood and urine concentrations of amphetamine in the body fluids of drug-impaired drivers apprehended in Sweden, where this stimulant is the major drug of abuse. The relationship between blood and urine concentrations of amphetamine was determined by multivariate analysis with urinary pH and creatinine as predictor variables. Amphetamine was determined in blood and urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with deuterium-labelled internal standards. The concentration of amphetamine in urine was about 200 times greater than the concentration in blood; the mean and median urine/blood ratios were 214 and 160, respectively, with large individual variations. The Pearson correlation coefficient between urine (y) and blood (x) amphetamine was r = 0.53, n = 48, which was statistically highly significant (P 0.05), whereas the corresponding regression coefficient for pH was highly significant and had a negative sign (-102 +/- 32.6, t= -3.12, P < 0.005). Other factors could impact on the urine blood amphetamine relationship, such as route of administration, pattern of voiding and time elapsed after use of the drug.