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Repeated adolescent MDMA (“Ecstasy”) exposure in rats increases behavioral and neuroendocrine re

Repeated adolescent MDMA (“Ecstasy”) exposure in rats increases behavioral and neuroendocrine re

  1. Synesthesiac
    BRAIN RESEARCH 1252 ( 2009 ) 8 7 – 9 3

    Dominik K. Biezonskia, Andrea B. Courtemanchea, Sang B. Hongc, Brian J. Pipera, Jerrold S. Meyera

    MDMA (3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) is a popular recreational drug among adolescents. The present study aimed to determine the effects of repeated intermittent administration of 10 mg/kg MDMA during adolescence on behavioral (Experiment 1) and neuroendocrine (Experiment 2) responses of rats to the 5-HT2A/2C agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy- 4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) and on [3H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2A receptors. In the first experiment, MDMA pretreatment increased the frequency of head twitches and back muscle contractions, but not wet-dog shakes, to a high-dose DOI challenge. In the second experiment, both the prolactin and corticosterone responses to DOI were potentiated in MDMA-pretreated animals. No changes were found in 5-HT2A receptor binding in the hypothalamus or other forebrain areas that were examined. These results indicate that intermittent adolescent MDMA exposure enhances sensitivity of 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the CNS, possibly through changes in downstream signaling mechanisms.