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Latest Reviews

  1. Reasonable
    For {Study} in Cannabis
    Reasonable
    5/5,
    Version: 1
    This is an excellent study that determined the prevalence of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome among patients in an emergency department of a public hospital to be 32.9% at a 95% level of confidence. I found it interesting the condition was most common in patients who were between the ages of 18-29. I learned of CHS through this study and remembered a forum thread where someone asked why they were experiencing stomach problems and pain when smoking cannabis. The symptoms were said to be relieved with hot showers and cessation of smoking.
  2. AbsinthDieOhren
    For {Study} in Amphetamines Chemistry
    AbsinthDieOhren
    5/5,
    Version: 2008-04-15
    good
  3. AbsinthDieOhren
    For {Study} in Amphetamines Chemistry
    AbsinthDieOhren
    5/5,
    Version: 2006-12-02
    nice
  4. snowangel91
    snowangel91
    5/5,
    Version: 2007-04-18
    This is by far, THE best harm reduction information I have ever came across. I have prevented many accidents/infections since reading this manual. Very easy to understand as well.
  5. Reasonable
    For {Study} in Pharmacology
    Reasonable
    5/5,
    Version: 1
    This is an incredibly relevant study on the allostatic drive's influences on circadian cycles with implications for improving cognitive health for people of all ages.

    ( I remember many times waking up to the smell of bacon frying in the downstairs kitchen, so that is certainly an environmental influence on sleep, even though that may be somewhat contradictory to this study because it concluded with a hypothesis that arousal was linked to lack of food in the environment which seems to be the opposite of my bacon wakin' experiences.)

    Amongst my favorite segments of this article is learning when the term allostatic drive was first coined ("McEwen and Stellar, in 1993, proposed the term ‘allostatic’ drive for situations where “rather than maintaining constancy, the physiologic
    systems within the body fluctuate to meet demands from
    external forces”).

    Another interesting tidbit that led me to my conclusion on its implications for improving cognitive health for all ages is:

    "Individuals who lose even small amounts of sleep on a daily basis show progressive impairment of cognitive performance and elevation of C-reactive protein, which predicts cardiovascular risk.

    Because older individuals sleep about half an hour less per day, it is possible that at least some of their cognitive decline and increase in cardiovascular disease might be explained by sleep restriction.

    Similarly, sleep loss might impair performance among adolescents who arise early for school, shift workers, overnight long-haul truckers and even medical personnel working in hospitals.

    The public-health implications of sleep loss indicate that there is a great deal at stake in working out the mechanisms that regulate our daily cycles of sleep
    and wakefulness."

    All in all, this is a 5-star study.