1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Small Changes in Ambient Temperature Cause Large Changes in 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

Small Changes in Ambient Temperature Cause Large Changes in 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

  1. Broshious
    The Journal of Neuroscience, July 1, 1998

    Malberg JE (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus), Seiden LS (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e...l.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus).

    The amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a drug of abuse and has been shown to be neurotoxic to 5-HT terminals in many species. MDMA-engendered neurotoxicity has been shown to be affected by both ambient temperature and core body temperature. We now report that small (2 degreesC) changes in ambient temperature produce changes in core temperature in MDMA-treated rats, but the same changes in ambient temperature do not affect core temperature of saline-treated animals. Furthermore, increases in core temperature of MDMA-treated animals increase neurotoxicity. Rats were given MDMA (20 or 40 mg/kg) or saline and placed in an ambient temperature of 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, or 30 degreesC using a novel temperature measurement apparatus that controls ambient temperature +/-0.5 degrees C. Two weeks after MDMA treatment, the rats were killed, and regional 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid levels were analyzed as a measure of neurotoxicity. Rats treated with MDMA at 20 and 22 degrees C showed a hypothermic core temperature response. Treatment with MDMA at 28 and 30 degreesC produced a hyperthermic response. At ambient temperatures of 20-24 degrees C, neurotoxicity was not observed in the frontal cortex, somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, or striatum. At ambient temperatures of 26-30 degrees C, neurotoxicity was seen and correlated with core temperature in all regions examined. These data indicate that ambient temperature has a significant affect on MDMA neurotoxicity, core temperature, and thermoregulation in rats. This finding has implications on both the temperature dependence of the mechanism of MDMA neurotoxicity and human use because fatal hyperthermia is associated with MDMA use in humans