1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Switching from Brand-Name to Generic Psychotropic Medications: A Literature Review

Switching from Brand-Name to Generic Psychotropic Medications: A Literature Review

  1. testodan
    Generic medications do not undergo the rigorous approval process required of original medications.
    Their effectiveness and safety is expected to be equal to that of their more expensive
    counterparts. However, several case reports and studies describe clinical deterioration
    and decreased tolerability with generic substitution. Pubmed was searched from January
    1, 1974 to March 1, 2010. The MeSH term “generic, drugs” was combined with “anticonvulsants,”
    “mood stabilizers,” “lithium,” “antidepressants,” “antipsychotics,” “anxiolytics,”
    and “benzodiazepines.” Additional articles were obtained by searching the bibliographies
    of relevant references. Articles in English, French, or Spanish were considered if they discussed
    clinical equivalence of generic and brand-name medications, generic substitution, or
    issues about effectiveness, tolerability, compliance, or economics encountered with generics.
    Clinical deterioration, adverse effects, and changes in pharmacokinetics are described
    with generic substitution of several anticonvulsants/mood stabilizers (carbamazepine,
    valproate, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, lithium), antidepressants (amitriptyline,
    nortriptyline, desipramine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, citalopram, sertraline, venlafaxine, mirtazapine,
    bupropion), antipsychotics (risperidone, clozapine), and anxiolytics (clonazepam,
    alprazolam). Generics do not always lead to the anticipated monetary savings and also raise
    compliance issues. Although the review is limited by publication bias and heterogeneity of
    the studies in the literature, we believe there is enough concern to advise generic switching
    on an individual basis with close monitoring throughout the transition. Health professionals
    should be aware of the stakes around generic substitution especially when health economics
    promote universal use of generics.