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The Effects of Piracetam in Children with Dyslexia

The Effects of Piracetam in Children with Dyslexia

  1. BitterSweet
    Following previous research which suggests that piracetam improves performance on tasks associated with the left hemisphere, a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of developmental dyslexics was conducted. Six study sites treated 257 dyslexic boys between the ages of 8 and 13 years who were significantly below their potential in reading performance. Children were of at least normal intelligence, had normal findings on audiologic, ophthalmologic, neurologic, and physical examination, and were neither educationally deprived nor emotionally disturbed. Piracetam was found to be well tolerated in this study population. Children treated with piracetam showed improvements in reading speed. No other effects on reading were observed. In addition, improvement in auditory sequential short-term memory was observed in those piracetam-treated patients who showed relatively poor memory at baseline. It is suggested that longer term treatment with piracetam may result in additional improvements.



    J Clin Psychopharmacol. 1985 Oct;5(5):272-8.
    The effects of piracetam in children with dyslexia.
    Di Ianni M, Wilsher CR, Blank MS, Conners CK, Chase CH, Funkenstein HH, Helfgott E, Holmes JM, Lougee L, Maletta GJ, et al.