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The Rise of the Modern Addict (1995)

The Rise of the Modern Addict (1995)

  1. Jatelka
    American Journal of Public Health 1995 Aug;85(8 Pt 1):1157-62

    Jonnes J

    In the mid-19th century, most American addicts were genteel women hooked on opiates through medical treatment. Within a few decades, a new group of addicts emerged--pleasure users who patronized opium dens. As local laws closed dens, the pleasure users--most often poor young men in northern cities--began experimenting with cocaine and heroin, causing an alarmed government to launch an escalating campaign to root out the new deviant subculture. Various treatment efforts were instituted, from short-lived clinics to federal narcotics farms. This drug use epidemic peaked in the 1920s and was essentially quelled by World War II. This paper briefly discusses differences between early British and US policies and the contemporary implications of this early drug use epidemic.