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The Use of Contingency Management and Motivational/Skills-Building Therapy to Treat Young Adults Wit

The Use of Contingency Management and Motivational/Skills-Building Therapy to Treat Young Adults Wit

  1. BitterSweet
    J Consult Clinical Psychology. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2007 December 20.
    Published in final edited form as: J Consult Clinical Psychology. 2006 October; 74(5): 955–966.
    doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.74.5.955
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2148500/#__ffn_sectitle

    Abstract
    Marijuana-dependent young adults (N = 136), all referred by the criminal justice system, were
    randomized to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: a motivational/skills-building intervention (motivational
    enhancement therapy/cognitive–behavioral therapy; MET/CBT) plus incentives contingent on
    session attendance or submission of marijuana-free urine specimens (contingency management;
    CM), MET/CBT without CM, individual drug counseling (DC) plus CM, and DC without CM. There
    was a significant main effect of CM on treatment retention and marijuana-free urine specimens.
    Moreover, the combination of MET/CBT plus CM was significantly more effective than MET/CBT
    without CM or DC plus CM, which were in turn more effective than DC without CM for treatment
    attendance and percentage of marijuana-free urine specimens. Participants assigned to MET/CBT
    continued to reduce the frequency of their marijuana use through a 6-month follow-up