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Web-scale pharmacovigilance: listening to signals from the crowd (2013)

Web-scale pharmacovigilance: listening to signals from the crowd (2013)

  1. Calliope
    Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. doi:10.1136/amiajnl-2012-001482

    Ryen W White, Nicholas P Tatonetti, Nigam H Shah, Russ B Altman, Eric Horvitz

    Abstract
    Adverse drug events cause substantial morbidity and mortality and are often discovered after a drug comes to market. We hypothesized that Internet users may provide early clues about adverse drug events via their online information-seeking. We conducted a large-scale study of Web search log data gathered during 2010. We pay particular attention to the specific drug pairing of paroxetine and pravastatin, whose interaction was reported to cause hyperglycemia after the time period of the online logs used in the analysis. We also examine sets of drug pairs known to be associated with hyperglycemia and those not associated with hyperglycemia. We find that anonymized signals on drug interactions can be mined from search logs. Compared to analyses of other sources such as electronic health records (EHR), logs are inexpensive to collect and mine. The results demonstrate that logs of the search activities of populations of computer users can contribute to drug safety surveillance.