USA - 2008 Election

Discussion in 'Drug Policy Reform & Narco Politics' started by Shiacmkmleer, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. Shiacmkmleer

    Shiacmkmleer Titanium Member

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    Tthe United States is having elections in two years for a new president. I believe it is interesting to see how each potential candidate stands on the drug war/legalization. Here's what some quick researched brought up.
    Obama:
    Understand why youngsters want to use drugs. (Aug 1996)
    Used Weed alcohol and I believe cocaine
    Hilary
    Q: What is your approach to the “Drug War”?
    CLINTON: I have spoken out on my belief that we should have drug courts that would serve as alternatives to the traditional criminal justice system for low-level offenders. If the person comes before the court, agrees to stay clean, is subjected to drug tests once a week, they are diverted from the criminal justice system. We need more treatment. It is unfair to urge people to get rid of their addiction and not have the treatment facilities when people finally makes up their minds to get treatment.


    Edwards
    • Supports drug courts and alternatives to incarceration. (Mar 2004)
    • Disparity in penalty for crack vs. powder is not justified. (Jan 2004)
    • Admits having smoked marijuana. (Nov 2003)
    • Voted NO on increasing penalties for drug offenses. (Nov 1999)
    • Rated B- by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record. (Dec 2003)



    McCain
    • Administration is AWOL on the war on drugs. (Mar 2000)
    • Public/private partnerships for drug treatment. (Jan 2000)
    • Prevention & education apply to alcohol as well as marijuana. (Oct 1999)
    • We’re losing drug war - just say no. (Oct 1999)
    • $1B for detection equipment for more border interdiction. (Mar 1999)
    • Mexico: balancing act between free trade & stopping drugs. (Mar 1999)
    • Restrict methadone treatment programs. (Feb 1999)
    • Stricter penalties; stricter enforcement. (Jul 1998)
    • Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control. (Jul 1996)
    Q: How do you reconcile the tolerance for alcohol with the intolerance for marijuana?
    A: I can’t support the legalization of marijuana. Scientific evidence indicates that the moment that it enters your body, one, it does damage, and second, it can become addictive. It is a gateway drug. There is a problem in American with alcohol abuse, and there’s no doubt about that. We have to do whatever we can to - prevention, education, and that applies to drugs too.




    source:
    http://www.ontheissues.org/




    What else do people know about the USA's potential next presidents stance on drugs?


    Ps sorry for my poor grammer
     
    1. 5/5,
      good topic
      Aug 16, 2007
  2. Nagognog2

    Nagognog2 Iridium Member

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    I'd say the Democrats are hypocrits to dare not want full-legalization of drugs. The reason being that if they run either Obama or Hillary - they must be stoned out of their skulls!

    Any Democrat out there pushing for either of these two is likely a Republikan plant.
     
  3. Woodman

    Woodman A very strange person. Platinum Member & Advisor

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    I have to agree About "Democrats" in relation to the general party sentiment toward "drugs", but I wouldn't go so far as to "legalize" drugs. I think Dems stand a better chance at painting Republicans as fear-mongering authoritarian racists for resisting the concept of decriminalizing recreational drugs in the first place.

    Republicans are really stupid in that regard, and NOW is the time to make a prominent distinction in policy differences between the two parties. The Dems could really wrap this thing up in 2008 by using statistical evidence to draw similarities between the "war on drugs" and the Vietnam "Conflict", and the "War" in Iraq.

    The disparity in death toll, alone, should be enough evidence to warrant serious reconsideration of current policy.

    If nothing else, it would amount to a serious 2008 presidential campaign issue that would cause republicans to fall back on their nationalist constituent base, but you can expect that most of those people are already worn from the extended Iraq war, and disillusioned by the Bush administration's disregard to Mexican immigration issues.

    I don't know why no Democrat is doing this.

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2007
  4. Nagognog2

    Nagognog2 Iridium Member

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    Why? Because drugs and laws concerning drugs are a "Third-Rail" issue. Touch it, and you get killed.
     
  5. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Gold Member

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    Drawing comparisons between Vietnam, Iraq and the "war on drugs" wouldn't work IMO. Imagine how the drooling dogs at FOX News would twist that into some sort of anti-patriotic movement - comparing the good ol' troops to a rock of crack.

    As Nago said, it's a third-rail issue. The time for change isn't here yet. America needs to get its ass out of wars and start thinking realistically again.
     
  6. Broshious

    Broshious Silver Member

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    Because everyone knows drugs are bad. If you ask someone why they're bad they can't for the life of them give you a reasonable explanation, but they still know they're bad.
     
  7. zera

    zera Gold Member

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    Ron Paul running for the Republican nomination is as far as I know the only member of Congress or any potential major party candidate that supports full legalization.
     
  8. Woodman

    Woodman A very strange person. Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Good point, but sometimes I post drunk, and it sure made sense at the time.
     
  9. Shiacmkmleer

    Shiacmkmleer Titanium Member

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    I hate to ruin your dreams... but I cant see him getting the nomination (although I'll sure as hell vote for him if he runs!) [and hes not so much of a libertarian as he'd have you belive he Voted NO on allowing human embryonic stem cell research. (May 2005) and Voted YES on banning gay adoptions in DC. (Jul 1999)]

    I dunno but maybe we should have a thread (maybe a lot closer to the elections) about Canadates and their stance on drugs.
     
  10. Nagognog2

    Nagognog2 Iridium Member

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    I'd say we should include a thread on what drugs they SHOULD be taking. Such as thorazine. Nixon was, towards the end. Why wait?
     
  11. zera

    zera Gold Member

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    Oh yeah, very very small chance of him getting the nomination. And yeah he's not as libertarian as I'd like (but then again I'm an anarcho-capitalist so pretty much no one is as libertarian as I'd like).

    Ed Muskie the front running candidate for the Democrat nomination in '72 until McGovern stormed the election, was a frequent user of Ibogaine. Then again I think a lot of people in 70s were, or at least Hunter S Thompson certainly seemed to be a big fan.
     
  12. Shiacmkmleer

    Shiacmkmleer Titanium Member

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    Well I've found my canadate for 2008: Ron Paul. A republican from Texas you ask? I quote on the issues
    I encourage all USA users of Drug forum to take a look at this guy (If the rules state I'm not allowed to advertise things including politcal canidates I'm sorry)


     
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  13. Bajeda

    Bajeda Super Moderator Platinum Member & Advisor

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  14. Bajeda

    Bajeda Super Moderator Platinum Member & Advisor

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    We are getting a bit closer to crunch time, so I thought the time was ripe for an update to this thread.



    Barack Obama

    Smokes cigarettes now; smoked some pot in high school

    [Some pundits question how well Obama's] brand of popularity will hold up when voters learn more about him, such as the fact that he's a smoker. That meant cigarettes, -- Obama, trying to quit, is down to puffing three a day. But when Jay Leno asked him in Dec. 2006 if he smoked, he was talking not about Marlboros but about pot. "Not recently--that was in high school," Obama responded. "Did you inhale?" Leno said, alluding to bill Clinton's famous dodge. "That was the point," Obama said. Source: Hopes and Dreams, by Steve Dougherty, p. 29-32 Feb 15, 2007

    Admitted marijuana use in high school & college


    Long before he was in the national media spotlight, Barack Obama had this to say about himself: "Junkie. Pothead. That's where I'd been headed: the final, fatal role of the young would-be black man... I got high [to] push questions of who I was out of my mind." Obama's revelations were not an issue during his Senate campaign two years ago. But now his open narrative of early, bad choices, including drug use starting in high school and ending in college, are sure to receive new scrutiny. Source: Lois Romano, Washington Post, p. A1 Jan 3, 2007

    Deal with street-level drug dealing as minimum-wage affair


    We need to tackle the nexus of unemployment and crime in the inner city. The conventional wisdom is that most unemployed inner-city men could find jobs if they really wanted to work; that they inevitably prefer drug dealing, with its attendant risks but potential profits, to the low-paying jobs that their lack of skill warrants. In fact, economists who've studied the issue--and the young men whose fates are at stake--will tell you that the costs and benefits of the street life don't match the popular mythology: At the bottom or even the middle ranks of the industry, drug dealing is a minimum-wage affair. For many inner-city men, what prevents gainful employment is not simply the absence of motivation to get off the streets but the absence of a job history or any marketable skills--and, increasingly, the stigma of a prison record. We can assume that with lawful work available for young men now in the drug trade, crime in any community would drop.
    Source: The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama, p.257-259 Oct 1, 2006


    • Smokes cigarettes now; smoked some pot in high school. (Feb 2007)
    • Admitted marijuana use in high school & college. (Jan 2007)
    • Deal with street-level drug dealing as minimum-wage affair. (Oct 2006)
    • Understand why youngsters want to use drugs. (Aug 1996)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Ron Paul
    • Legalize industrial hemp. (Jan 2007)
    • Voted NO on military border patrols to battle drugs & terrorism. (Sep 2001)
    • Voted NO on subjecting federal employees to random drug tests. (Sep 1998)
    • War on Drugs has abused Bill of Rights . (Dec 2000)
    • Legalize medical marijuana. (Jul 2001)
    • Rated A by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record. (Dec 2003)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Dennis Kucinich

    Hasn't smoked marijuana, but would decriminalize it

    At the "Rock the Vote" debate, the moderator inevitably asked,. "Which of you are ready to admit to having used marijuana in the past?""Yes," said John Kerry, leading off. "Yes," said John Edwards . "Yes," said Howard Dean. None of these three baby-boomer candidates said anything beyond their short, declarative affirmations. None followed with a hurried explanation that it was just a few times, that it was some kind of "youthful indiscretion," or that he didn't inhale. The implication of their answers seemed to be, "Yeah, so what?"
    In fact, the defensive answers tended to come from those replying in the negative. "No," said Dennis Kucinich. "But I think it ought to be decriminalized."
    "I grew up in the church," said Al Sharpton. "We didn't believe in that."
    "I have a reputation for giving unpopular answers," said Joe Lieberman. "I never used marijuana. Sorry!"
    In the next day's news coverage, the admissions of marijuana smoking were largely ignored.
    Source: [X-ref Kerry] Steven Holmes, NY Times Nov 9, 2003

    Emphasizes rehabilitation over incarceration


    Q: Most of the people who use drugs are white. Most of the people who are sentenced for drug possession and sales are black. What will you do to reverse this unfair trend?KUCINICH: First of all, we have to acknowledge that drug sentencing ends up being discriminatory, that our drug laws are harsh in that they emphasize not just criminalization but they emphasize incarceration. We need different thinking today. My presidency will mean that we will begin to emphasize the rehabilitation of people who are afflicted with drug use. And we will begin to emphasize giving people an opportunity to fully recover. This is one of the reasons why we need a not-for-profit health care system which includes treatment of substance abusers. This is why we need to make sure we focus this country on a cause which takes us away from this punitive approach that we use for people who are trapped in drug use. We need an approach which emphasizes rehabilitation over incarceration.
    Source: Congressional Black Caucus Institute debate Sep 9, 2003

    War on Drugs benefits only the prison-industrial complex


    A safe, free and just America is undermined, not bolstered, by the costly and ineffective War on Drugs. Criminalization over treatment has led to increased violent crime, misdirected resources of law enforcement and restricted Constitutional liberties. The US must rethink a policy that produces many casualties, but benefits only the prison-industrial complex. Source: Campaign website, www.Kucinich.us, "On The Issues" Aug 1, 2003

    Racial bias in drug enforcement is pervasive


    Racial bias in the enforcement of drug laws is pervasive. Drug use is consistent across racial and socioeconomic lines, yet in the state of New York, for example, 94% of incarcerated drug offenders are Latino or African-American, mostly from poor communities. Source: Campaign website, www.Kucinich.us, "On The Issues" Aug 1, 2003

    Addiction is a medical and moral problem


    Addiction is a medical and moral problem that should be treated by professionals, not dumped on the criminal justice system. In our country, only one bed exists for every ten people who apply for drug treatment. Source: Campaign website, www.Kucinich.us, "On The Issues" Aug 1, 2003

    Voted NO on military border patrols to battle drugs & terrorism.


    Amendment to set up a task force on counter-terrorism and drug interdiction and allow military personnel to help patrol U.S. borders. Bill HR 2586 ; vote number 2001-356 on Sep 25, 2001

    Voted NO on prohibiting needle exchange & medical marijuana in DC.


    Vote to pass a bill that provides $429.1 million in funds for the District of Columbia and approves the District's $6.8 billion budget. Among other provisions, the bill prohibits the use of federal funds for needle exchange programs, prohibits implementing an approved ballot initiative to legalize the medicinal use of marijuana. Reference: Bill sponsored by Istook, R-OK; Bill HR 3064 ; vote number 1999-504 on Oct 14, 1999

    Voted NO on subjecting federal employees to random drug tests.


    Drug Demand Reduction Act: Vote on an amendment to require that anyone hired by the Federal Government is subject to random, unannounced drug testing. Reference: Amendment by Taylor, D-MS; bill by Portman, R-OH.; Bill HR 4550 ; vote number 1998-443 on Sep 16, 1998

    Rated A+ by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record.


    Kucinich scores A+ by VOTE-HEMP on pro-hemp legalization policies VOTE HEMP is a non-profit organization dedicated to the acceptance of and free market for Industrial Hemp. Industrial Hemp is non-psychoactive low THC varieties of the cannabis sativa plant. Currently, it is illegal for U.S. farmers to grow Industrial Hemp because it is improperly classified as a "drug" under the Controlled Substances Act. Since changes in law require shifts in thinking and this requires education in the facts, our primary goal is the education of legislators and regulators, farmers and businesses, students and other concerned citizens.
    Source: VOTE-HEMP website 02n-HEMP on Dec 31, 2003
    • Hasn't smoked marijuana, but would decriminalize it. (Nov 2003)
    • Emphasizes rehabilitation over incarceration. (Sep 2003)
    • War on Drugs benefits only the prison-industrial complex. (Aug 2003)
    • Racial bias in drug enforcement is pervasive. (Aug 2003)
    • Addiction is a medical and moral problem. (Aug 2003)
    • Voted NO on military border patrols to battle drugs & terrorism. (Sep 2001)
    • Voted NO on prohibiting needle exchange & medical marijuana in DC. (Oct 1999)
    • Voted NO on subjecting federal employees to random drug tests. (Sep 1998)
    • Rated A+ by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record. (Dec 2003)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
     
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  15. Bajeda

    Bajeda Super Moderator Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Mike Gravel

    Drugs are public health issue, not criminal issue

    One of the areas that touches me the most and enrages me the most is our war on drugs that this country has been putting forth for the last generation. In 1972, we had 179,000 human beings in jail in this country; today, it's 2.3 million, and 70% are African-Americans.And I hope my colleagues will join me in standing up and saying, like FDR did with Prohibition, "We'll do away with that." And FDR did it. And if I'm president, I will do away with the war on drugs, which does nothing but savage our inner cities and put our children at risk.
    There's no reason for this. There's not an American that doesn't understand the culture and the understanding that Prohibition was a failure, and so we repeat it again like we repeated Iraq after we had the failure of Vietnam. When will we learn? When we learn that the issue of drugs is a public health issue. Addiction is a public health issue, not a criminal issue where we throw people in jail and criminalize them to no advancement to the people.
    Source: 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard University Jun 28, 2007

    FactCheck: Only 40% of inmates are black; not 70% as claimed


    Former Alaska Sen. Mike Gravel gave a vastly inflated statistic about the incarceration of African Americans. Gravel said, "In 1972, we had 179,000 human beings in jail in this country; today, it's 2.3 million, and 70% are black, African Americans." Gravel got part of that right. According to the Justice Department, there are nearly 2.3 million people incarcerated as of June 2006. But nowhere near 70% of inmates are African American--the correct number is 40%.
    Source: FactCheck on 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard U. Jun 28, 2007

    War on drugs loses an entire generation to our prisons


    We are losing an entire generation of young men & women to our prisons. Our nation's ineffective & wasteful "war on drugs" plays a major role in this. We must place a greater emphasis on rehabilitation & prevention. We must de-criminalize minor drug offenses & increase the availability & visibility of substance abuse treatment & prevention in our communities as well as in prisons.We must increase the use of special drug courts in which addicted offenders are given the opportunity to complete court supervised substance abuse treatment instead of being sentenced to prison. Drug defendants convicted of nonviolent offenses should be given alternative penalties [instead of] mandatory prison sentences. We should emphasize the criminalization of the importers, manufacturers, and major distributors, rather than just the street venders. Prisons in this country should be a legitimate criminal sanction -- but it should be an extension of a fair, just and wise society.
    Source: Campaign website, www.gravel2008.us, "Issues" May 23, 2007

    Legalize the use and possession of marijuana


    Senator Gravel advocates for the legalization of the use and possession of marijuana and ending the war on drugs and treating drugs as a medical problem rather than a criminal problem. Source: Wikipedia.org article on Mike Gravel campaign Feb 26, 2007
    • Drugs are public health issue, not criminal issue. (Jun 2007)
    • FactCheck: Only 40% of inmates are black; not 70% as claimed. (Jun 2007)
    • War on drugs loses an entire generation to our prisons. (May 2007)
    • Legalize the use and possession of marijuana. (Feb 2007)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Hillary Clinton

    Divert non-violent drug offenders away from prison

    We need diversion, like drug courts. Non-violent offenders should not be serving hard time in our prisons. They need to be diverted from our prison system. We need to make sure that we do deal with the distinction between crack and powder cocaine. And ultimately we need an attorney general and a system of justice that truly does treat people equally, and that has not happened under this administration. Source: 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard University Jun 28, 2007

    Address drug problem with treatment and special drug courts


    Q: What is your approach to the “Drug War”?CLINTON: I have spoken out on my belief that we should have drug courts that would serve as alternatives to the traditional criminal justice system for low-level offenders. If the person comes before the court, agrees to stay clean, is subjected to drug tests once a week, they are diverted from the criminal justice system. We need more treatment. It is unfair to urge people to get rid of their addiction and not have the treatment facilities when people finally makes up their minds to get treatment.
    LAZIO: The truth is that under the Clinton administration, there has been a dramatic and troubling increase in drug abuse by our children. And that has not been addressed. I crossed party lines in 1994 and built a coalition of Republicans that passed the crime bill. If it were not for that, we would not have drug courts right now. We would not have community policing. We need to have somebody in Washington who has the ability to get the job done.
    Source: Senate debate in Manhattan Oct 8, 2000
    • Divert non-violent drug offenders away from prison. (Jun 2007)
    • Address drug problem with treatment and special drug courts. (Oct 2000)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    John Edwards

    Help convicts with drug counseling & job counseling

    Changing mandatory minimum, changing the disparity between crack and powder cocaine--those things are correct. But can we also create an infrastructure for success for those who are charged and convicted for the first time, so that we help them with drug counseling, job counseling, job training, education--help them get the back into the community with some chance of changing their lives. Source: 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard University Jun 28, 2007

    Supports drug courts and alternatives to incarceration


    I support keeping drugs out of the United States and vigorous prosecution of drug sales. I also support greater funding for drug treatment and alternatives to incarceration for nonviolent offenders such as drug courts. Source: 2004 Presidential National Political Awareness Test Mar 3, 2004

    Disparity in penalty for crack vs. powder is not justified


    Improve Drug Sentencing: Today, a drug user with the same amount of cocaine is punished very differently depending on the type of cocaine - for crack cocaine the penalty is 100 times greater than for powder cocaine. This disparity is not justified. Edwards will address this disparity while at the same time imposing harsher sentences on drug crimes involving weapons, violence, or other aggravating circumstances. Source: Campaign website, JohnEdwards.com, "Real Solutions" Jan 1, 2004

    Admits having smoked marijuana


    At the "Rock the Vote" debate, the moderator inevitably asked,. "Which of you are ready to admit to having used marijuana in the past?""Yes," said John Kerry, leading off. "Yes," said John Edwards . "Yes," said Howard Dean. None of these three baby-boomer candidates said anything beyond their short, declarative affirmations. None followed with a hurried explanation that it was just a few times, that it was some kind of "youthful indiscretion," or that he didn't inhale. The implication of their answers seemed to be, "Yeah, so what?"
    In fact, the defensive answers tended to come from those replying in the negative. "No," said Dennis Kucinich. "But I think it ought to be decriminalized."
    "I grew up in the church," said Al Sharpton. "We didn't believe in that."
    "I have a reputation for giving unpopular answers," said Joe Lieberman. "I never used marijuana. Sorry!"
    In the next day's news coverage, the admissions of marijuana smoking were largely ignored.
    Source: [X-ref Kerry] Steven Holmes, NY Times Nov 9, 2003

    Voted NO on increasing penalties for drug offenses.


    Vote to increase penalties on certain drug-related crimes. The amendment would specifically target the manufacturing or trafficking of amphetamines & methamphetamines and possession of powder cocaine, and set stronger penalties for dealing drugs Reference: Bill S.625 ; vote number 1999-360 on Nov 10, 1999

    Rated B- by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record.


    Edwards scores B- by VOTE-HEMP on pro-hemp legalization policies VOTE HEMP is a non-profit organization dedicated to the acceptance of and free market for Industrial Hemp. Industrial Hemp is non-psychoactive low THC varieties of the cannabis sativa plant. Currently, it is illegal for U.S. farmers to grow Industrial Hemp because it is improperly classified as a "drug" under the Controlled Substances Act. Since changes in law require shifts in thinking and this requires education in the facts, our primary goal is the education of legislators and regulators, farmers and businesses, students and other concerned citizens.
    Source: VOTE-HEMP website 02n-HEMP on Dec 31, 2003
    • Help convicts with drug counseling & job counseling. (Jun 2007)
    • Supports drug courts and alternatives to incarceration. (Mar 2004)
    • Disparity in penalty for crack vs. powder is not justified. (Jan 2004)
    • Admits having smoked marijuana. (Nov 2003)
    • Voted NO on increasing penalties for drug offenses. (Nov 1999)
    • Rated B- by VOTE-HEMP, indicating a pro-hemp voting record. (Dec 2003)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
     
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  16. Bajeda

    Bajeda Super Moderator Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Rudy Giuliani

    In Dorismond drug shooting, sullied victim as "no choirboy"

    On March 15 2000, Patrick Dorismond finished his shift as a security guard & headed home with another guard. As the two tried to hail a cab, a man approached Dorismond and asked him if he had drugs for sale. Insulted at the suggestion, Dorismond shouted a melee ensued. When it was over, Dorismond lay mortally wounded. The would-be buyer was actually an undercover narcotics agent.Giuliani attempted damage control. A juvenile record was discovered--when Dorismond was 14, he had been arrested on robbery charges, which were dropped---& Giuliani took the unheard-of step of unsealing and publicizing the juvenile record. Giuliani then uttered the racially inflaming 3 words.
    Al Sharpton commented, "When Giuliani said 'He's no choirboy,' it was almost as if someone had driven a stake through the mother's heart. A lot of the passion that I bring to fights is caused by being so close to the family. In revealing the sealed documents and distorting them, the mayor really shook the Dorismond family.
    Source: Flawed or Flawless, by Deborah & Gerald Strober, p.219-224 Jan 16, 2007

    Drug policy should be an integral part of foreign policy


    We need to call on the on the federal government after having done our job effectively [on crime reduction] to make [drug reduction] an important part of our foreign policy, rather than a secondary part. After all it has to do with the future of our children and it is just important as international trade. And it’s just a important as wars that may be going on in different parts of the world, because it has to do with how productive America is going to be into the next generation. Source: Speech at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government Sep 29, 1997
    • In Dorismond drug shooting, sullied victim as "no choirboy". (Jan 2007)
    • Drug policy should be an integral part of foreign policy. (Sep 1997)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    John McCain

    Administration is AWOL on the war on drugs

    Of the four major candidates, McCain has expressed the most hawkish positions on drug policy. He wants to increas penalties for selling drugs, supports the death penalty for drug kingpins, favors tightening security to stop the flow of drugs into the country, and wants to restrict availability of methadone for heroin addicts. He said the Clinton administration was “AWOL on the war on drugs” and he would push for more money and military assistance to drug-supplying nations such as Colombia. Source: Boston Globe, p. A21 Mar 5, 2000

    Public/private partnerships for drug treatment


    McCain indicates that federally sponsored drug education and drug treatment programs should be expanded. He says, “Work to expand public/private partnerships in support of such initiatives, and coordinate them with state and local efforts.” Source: Vote-Smart.org 2000 NPAT Jan 13, 2000

    Prevention & education apply to alcohol as well as marijuana


    Q: How do you reconcile the tolerance for alcohol with the intolerance for marijuana?
    A: I can’t support the legalization of marijuana. Scientific evidence indicates that the moment that it enters your body, one, it does damage, and second, it can become addictive. It is a gateway drug. There is a problem in American with alcohol abuse, and there’s no doubt about that. We have to do whatever we can to - prevention, education, and that applies to drugs too. Source: Republican Debate at Dartmouth College Oct 29, 1999

    We’re losing drug war - just say no


    We’re losing the war on drugs. We ought to say, “It’s not a war anymore,” or we really ought to go after it. And there was a time in our history when we weren’t always losing the war on drugs. It was when Nancy Reagan had a very simple program called “Just Say No.” And young Americans were reducing the usage of drugs in America. Source: Republican Debate at Dartmouth College Oct 29, 1999

    $1B for detection equipment for more border interdiction


    I support the Drug Free Borders Act of 1999. This legislation funds advanced sensing equipment for detecting illegal drugs before they can cross our border and emerge on the streets of America’s cities. This Act authorizes over $1 billion to beef-up operations along our borders with Mexico and Canada, as well as at maritime ports. This legislation is a sound, responsible approach to enhancing this country’s capabilities to interdict the flow of drugs before they reach our children. Source: Senate statement, “Drug Free Borders” Mar 18, 1999

    Mexico: balancing act between free trade & stopping drugs


    [There are] dangers implicit in failing to properly monitor traffic crossing the Mexican border. Yet, Mexico is one of our largest trading partners, and it is in our best interest to maintain as open a border as possible. It is a careful balancing act. [We should] ensure that we are doing everything we can to stem the flow of illegal drugs without impeding the flow of legitimate commerce. The key to finding that balance is procuring equipment to expeditiously scan incoming cargo. Source: Senate statement, “Drug Free Borders” Mar 18, 1999

    Restrict methadone treatment programs


    McCain introduced the “Addiction Free Treatment Act” (S.423), which prohibits the use of funds for any drug treatment or rehabilitation program that uses methadone or other heroin detoxification agents unless the program follows specified guidelines, including that the program has as its primary objective the elimination of drug addiction and that it conducts random and frequent comprehensive drug testing for all narcotics. Source: Senate statements S.423 Feb 11, 1999

    Stricter penalties; stricter enforcement

    • McCain supports the following principles concerning illegal drugs:
    • Increase penalties for selling illegal drugs
    • Impose mandatory jail sentences for selling illegal drugs
    • Impose capital punishment for convicted international drug traffickers
    • Strengthen current laws dealing with non-controlled substances, including inhalants and commercially available pills
    • Increase funding for border security to stop the flow of illegal drugs into the US
    Source: Project Vote Smart, 1998, www.vote-smart.org Jul 2, 1998

    Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control.


    Vote to add an additional $53 million (raising the total to $213 million) to international narcotics control funding, and pay for it by taking $25 million from international operations funding and $28 million from development assistance. Reference: Bill HR 3540 ; vote number 1996-244 on Jul 25, 1996


    • Administration is AWOL on the war on drugs. (Mar 2000)
    • Public/private partnerships for drug treatment. (Jan 2000)
    • Prevention & education apply to alcohol as well as marijuana. (Oct 1999)
    • We’re losing drug war - just say no. (Oct 1999)
    • $1B for detection equipment for more border interdiction. (Mar 1999)
    • Mexico: balancing act between free trade & stopping drugs. (Mar 1999)
    • Restrict methadone treatment programs. (Feb 1999)
    • Stricter penalties; stricter enforcement. (Jul 1998)
    • Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control. (Jul 1996)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Fred Thompson
    Voted YES on increasing penalties for drug offenses.
    Vote to increase penalties on certain drug-related crimes. The amendment would specifically target the manufacturing or trafficking of amphetamines & methamphetamines and possession of powder cocaine, and set stronger penalties for dealing drugs
    Reference: Bill S.625 ; vote number 1999-360 on Nov 10, 1999 ​

    Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control.
    Vote to add an additional $53 million (raising the total to $213 million) to international narcotics control funding, and pay for it by taking $25 million from international operations funding and $28 million from development assistance.
    Reference: Bill HR 3540 ; vote number 1996-244 on Jul 25, 1996​
    • Voted YES on increasing penalties for drug offenses. (Nov 1999)
    • Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control. (Jul 1996)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Bill Richardson
    Treatment & education over enforcement & incarceration
    We need to find ways that we deal with substance abuse. In New Mexico and the west, meth is the biggest problem, and we don't have answers in terms of how we can best treat it. If you're going to deal with substance abuse, mental health problems, alcoholism, what is critically important, not just law enforcement, incarceration, but treatment and education, an investment in serious substance abuse programs that can make things better.
    Source: SEIU Democratic Health Care Forum in Las Vegas Mar 24, 2007 ​

    Crack down on illegal drug labs
    We're cracking down on illegal drug labs - these dangerous, makeshift factories are popping up almost daily in neighborhoods across our state. In addition to the deadly product they produce, the labs are a danger to nearby residents, and anyone in the house, including children. Our State Police are targeting these illegal drug labs and will throw the book at anyone making drugs, and raise the penalties for those doing so with children present.
    Source: State of the State speech to the New Mexico Legislature Jan 20, 2004 ​

    No legalization: drugs play an insidious role in crime
    My philosophy towards drug use is not legalization, but recognition of the dangerous, insidious role drugs play in crime in New Mexico.
    Effective, immediate and mandatory drug and alcohol treatment is one of the most effective tools to cut crime.
    I am proposing a mandatory New Mexico Drug Court for first-time, non-violent offenders who are arrested for drug or alcohol related crimes.
    Source: Campaign web site, RichardsonForGovernor.com, "Priorities" Oct 24, 2002 ​

    Drug Courts and treatment instead of incarceration
    My goal is to see an adequate number of Drug Courts in each of the state's judicial districts. Under my proposal, first-time, non-violent offenders who are arrested for drug or alcohol related crimes-as an alternative to incarceration- must adhere to a strict regimen of treatment, counseling, tests, community service, and hearings. If the offender misses a step, he or she has to pay fines and do jail time. Participants must pay for the program as they are able, and the court will determine the individual's ability.
    Many national studies have shown the same thing: drug courts work. Graduates have a far less chance of re-arrest than if they were sentenced and then released, or just put on probation. Drug courts are the first step towards reducing addiction rates and criminal activity. But they must be accompanied by expansion of our treatment facilities, throughout NM. In the long term, this policy will lead to savings in prosecution and jail costs.
    Source: Campaign web site, RichardsonForGovernor.com, "Priorities" Oct 24, 2002 ​

    Mandatory jail sentences for selling illegal drugs
    Indicate which principles you support concerning illegal drugs.
    • Increase penalties for selling illegal drugs.
    • Impose mandatory jail sentences for selling illegal drugs.
    • Impose capital punishment for convicted international drug traffickers.
    • Increase funding of federally-sponsored drug education and drug treatment programs.
    • Treatment & education over enforcement & incarceration. (Mar 2007)
    • Pushed "War on DWI"--you drink, you drive, you lose. (Nov 2005)
    • Crack down on illegal drug labs. (Jan 2004)
    • No legalization: drugs play an insidious role in crime. (Oct 2002)
    • Drug Courts and treatment instead of incarceration. (Oct 2002)
    • Mandatory jail sentences for selling illegal drugs. (Nov 1996)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    Joe Biden
    Divert drug offenders out of prison system
    1. The bulk of sentencing inequity is at the state level, not at the federal level.
    2. We need diversion out of the system. I'm the guy that wrote the drug court legislation that is in the law right now.
    3. You have to eliminate the disparity between crack & powdered cocaine. I've introduced legislation to do that.
    4. You have to find a way in which you insist that the states apply the law equally--they don't.
    5. 300,000 will come out addicted from the prison this year
    Source: 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard University Jun 28, 2007 ​

    Created nation's Drug Czar Office & drug courts
    As the Co-Chairman of the Senate Drug Caucus, Senator Biden has long been a national voice for effective drug control policies. He created the nation's Drug Czar Office to oversee the federal government's anti-drug strategy. Biden also helped create "drug courts" that combine intensive supervision, drug testing and treatment for non-violent first offenders.
    Source: PAC website, www.UniteOurStates.com Dec 12, 2006 ​

    Voted NO on increasing penalties for drug offenses.
    Vote to increase penalties on certain drug-related crimes. The amendment would specifically target the manufacturing or trafficking of amphetamines & methamphetamines and possession of powder cocaine, and set stronger penalties for dealing drugs
    Reference: Bill S.625 ; vote number 1999-360 on Nov 10, 1999 ​

    Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control.
    Vote to add an additional $53 million (raising the total to $213 million) to international narcotics control funding, and pay for it by taking $25 million from international operations funding and $28 million from development assistance.
    Reference: Bill HR 3540 ; vote number 1996-244 on Jul 25, 1996 ​

    • Divert drug offenders out of prison system. (Jun 2007)
    • Created nation's Drug Czar Office & drug courts. (Dec 2006)
    • Voted NO on increasing penalties for drug offenses. (Nov 1999)
    • Voted YES on spending international development funds on drug control. (Jul 1996)
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________



    More to come when I get the time....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2017
  17. UberDouche

    UberDouche Titanium Member

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    Very, very informative, Bajeda. Thank you for this excellent information! I really like how you have conglomerated this disparate information into one source.
     
  18. Heretic.Ape.

    Heretic.Ape. Platinum Member & Advisor

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    How quaint... the notion that a presidential candidate, regardless of previous rhetoric, would dare defy the neoliberal religion beyond trying to bang his (or her) fake brass balls during an election or that their past would bear any relevance to being "at the top". Cute. Sorry, maybe I am a drunk cynic. Here's my advice for presidential elections... look for the most evil fuck and try to make sure they don't make it... then we might at least not go too far backwards, only keep screwing the country on an average rate.
    No offense for all your effort Baj, but when has it ever mattered what a presidential candidate said or acted as a lower level politician? There is only one concern for a politician: grabbing money from lobbyists. That's the only thing I liked about Hillary clinton's interview a little while ago... she said she would take money from lobbyist "because they represent real people" but would a moment later said she would not listen to what they had to say, LOL. (Note, that is me making fun of her, not endorsing her)
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2007
  19. jux

    jux Titanium Member

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    Bill Richardson also signed Senate Bill 523 which legalized medical marijuana in NM
     
  20. Shiacmkmleer

    Shiacmkmleer Titanium Member

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    yea but he might do terrible things to drugs otherwise... i mean look at bajeda's post

    thats not exactly.... promising.

    As to Zera. Yes I agree Ron Paul could be better but imo hes the best chance we got.
     
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