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Drug info - Amitriptyline: Recreational Effects?

Discussion in 'Antidepressants' started by Insane Asian, May 31, 2004.

  1. Insane Asian

    Insane Asian Silver Member

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    i have 5 little green pills with M51 on them. i want to know if this is valium. also if it is valium what will taking 1 do, i know i should take 2 but i have 5 and thats an odd number. how long does valium take to kick in and how long does it last. also what is the high like
     
  2. str8ballin

    str8ballin Silver Member

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    I don't think that pill is valium.I looked it up on drugs.com and M 51 comes up as amitriptyline hydrochloride,an anti-depressant.I'm not sure about the recommended dosage maybe somebody else can help you with that.
     
  3. Insane Asian

    Insane Asian Silver Member

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    i couldnt find anything on it on drugs.com i was told it was valium how sure are you its not valium
     
  4. Hydrocodone

    Hydrocodone Newbie

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    Ive taken amitriptyline before, its not fun. Though I did take 8 of them at the time. I was f**ked up beyond taking 3 zanbars for too damn long and couldnt hardly walk or talk right. Be careful
     
  5. ShadyMilkman

    ShadyMilkman Mercury Member

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    Yes, the pill is definitely Amitriptyline Hydrochloride 25mg. Might want to google that.
     
  6. ShadyMilkman

    ShadyMilkman Mercury Member

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    Update:



    Uses



    Indication



    Symptomatic treatment of depressive illness especially where sedation

    is required. Nocturnal enuresis in children.



    Therapeutic dosage



    in adults

    In depression

    by mouth: 75-150 mg daily in single or divided doses (lower doses in

    elderly and adolescents).

    by IM or IV injection: 10-20 mg four times daily.



    in children

    For nocturnal enuresis:

    6-10 years: 10-20 mg daily by mouth.

    11-16 years: 25-50 mg daily by mouth.

    Modified release preparations are not licensed for use in children.



    Contra-indications



    Recent myocardial infarction or coronary artery insufficiency. Heart

    block or other cardiac arrhythmia. Mania. Severe liver disease.

    Co-administration with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Hypersensitivity

    to amitriptyline. Lactation. Children under 6 years of age.
     
  7. VIKETIME

    VIKETIME Newbie

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    amitriptyline

    i got prescribed some of this..can i use it recreationally at all? i got it for migranes/insomnia so im guessin it might be fun? any help would be appreciated.


    -VIKETIME
     
  8. OneDiaDem

    OneDiaDem Nefelibata Platinum Member

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    I have grips of it, all it does is make me tired.</font>
     
  9. aMorphius

    aMorphius Newbie

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    Some friends of mine who tried this as a recreational drug told me that all
    that happened was that they were too tired to move and could hardly stay
    awake or focus their eyes. Sounds like a good sleeping pill to me.
     
  10. Micklemouse

    Micklemouse Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Amitrypiline isn't a Benzo, it's a Tricyclic Antidepressant, sometimes used as a sleeping aid because of it's sedating qualities. Little or no recreational value, but quite risky in high doses. Quite popular with overdosers looking fir a way out...

    From the BNF...

    AMITRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE
    Additional information: interactions (Amitriptyline).
    Indications: depressive illness, particularly where sedation is required; nocturnal enuresis in children (section 7.4.2)
    Cautions: cardiac disease (particularly with arrhythmias, see Contra-indications below), history of epilepsy, pregnancy and breast-feeding (Appendixes 4 and 5), elderly, hepatic impairment (avoid if severe), thyroid disease, phaeochromocytoma, history of mania, psychoses (may aggravate psychotic symptoms), angle-closure glaucoma, history of urinary retention, concurrent electroconvulsive therapy; if possible avoid abrupt withdrawal; anaesthesia (increased risk of arrhythmias and hypotension, see surgery section 15.1); porphyria (section 9.8.2); see section 7.4.2 for additional nocturnal enuresis warnings; interactions: Appendix 1 (antidepressants, tricyclic)
    DRIVING. Drowsiness may affect performance of skilled tasks (e.g. driving); effects of alcohol enhanced
    Contra-indications: recent myocardial infarction, arrhythmias (particularly heart block), not indicated in manic phase, severe liver disease
    Side-effects: dry mouth, sedation, blurred vision (disturbance of accommodation, increased intra-ocular pressure), constipation, nausea, difficulty with micturition; cardiovascular side-effects (such as ECG changes, arrhythmias, postural hypotension, tachycardia, syncope, particularly with high doses); sweating, tremor, rashes and hypersensitivity reactions (including urticaria, photosensitivity), behavioural disturbances (particularly children), hypomania or mania, confusion (particularly elderly), interference with sexual function, blood sugar changes; increased appetite and weight gain (occasionally weight loss); endocrine side-effects such as testicular enlargement, gynaecomastia, galactorrhoea; also convulsions (see also Cautions), movement disorders and dyskinesias, fever, agranulocytosis, leucopenia, eosinophilia, purpura, thrombocytopenia, hyponatraemia (may be due to inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion) see CSM advicesection 4.3, abnormal liver function tests (jaundice); for a general outline of side-effects see also notes above; overdosage: see Emergency Treatment of Poisoning
    Dose: depression, initially 75 mg (elderly and adolescents 30–75 mg) daily in divided doses or as a single dose at bedtime increased gradually as necessary to 150–200 mg; child under 16 years not recommended for depression
    Nocturnal enuresis, child 7–10 years 10–20 mg, 11–16 years 25–50 mg at night; max. period of treatment (including gradual withdrawal) 3 months—full physical examination before further course

    Amitriptyline

    Amitriptyline has the following interaction information:
    Cimetidinemetabolism of amitriptyline inhibited by cimetidine (increased plasma concentration)
    Disulfiramconcomitant amitriptyline reported to increase disulfiram reaction with alcohol
    St John's Wortplasma concentration of amitriptyline reduced by St John's wort
    Thyroid Hormoneseffects of amitriptyline enhanced by thyroid hormones

    Amitriptyline belongs to Antidepressants, Tricyclic and will have the following interactions:
    Adrenaline (epinephrine) increased risk of hypertension and arrhythmias when tricyclics given with adrenaline (epinephrine) (but local anaesthetics with adrenaline appear to be safe)
    Adrenergic Neurone Blockers tricyclics antagonise hypotensive effect of adrenergic neurone blockers
    Alcohol increased sedative effect when tricyclics given with alcohol
    Amiodarone increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with amiodarone —avoid concomitant use

    Amiodarone has a long half-life; there is a potential for drug interactions to occur for several weeks (or even months) after treatment with it has been stopped
    Anaesthetics, General increased risk of arrhythmias and hypotension when tricyclics given with general anaesthetics

    See also Surgery and Long-term Medication, section 15.1
    Antidepressants, SSRI plasma concentration of some tricyclics increased by SSRIs
    Antiepileptics tricyclics antagonise anticonvulsant effect of antiepileptics (convulsive threshold lowered)
    Antihistamines increased antimuscarinic and sedative effects when tricyclics given with antihistamines

    Sedative interactions apply to a lesser extent to the non-sedating antihistamines. Interactions do not generally apply to antihistamines used for topical action (including inhalation)
    Antimuscarinics increased risk of antimuscarinic side-effects when tricyclics given with antimuscarinics

    Many drugs have antimuscarinic effects; concomitant use of two or more such drugs can increase side-effects such as dry mouth, urine retention, and constipation; concomitant use can also lead to confusion in the elderly. Interactions do not generally apply to antimuscarinics used by inhalation
    Antipsychotics plasma concentration of tricyclics increased by antipsychotics —possibly increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias

    Increased risk of toxicity with myelosuppressive drugs
    Anxiolytics and Hypnotics increased sedative effect when tricyclics given with anxiolytics and hypnotics
    Apraclonidine avoidance of tricyclics advised by manufacturer of apraclonidine
    Baclofen tricyclics enhance muscle relaxant effect of baclofen
    Barbiturates tricyclics antagonises anticonvulsant effect of barbiturates (convulsive threshold lowered), also metabolism of tricyclics possibly accelerated (reduced plasma concentration)
    Brimonidine avoidance of tricyclics advised by manufacturer of brimonidine
    Carbamazepine metabolism of tricyclics accelerated by carbamazepine (reduced plasma concentration and reduced effect)
    Cimetidine plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly increased by cimetidine
    Clonidine tricyclics antagonise hypotensive effect of clonidine , also increased risk of hypertension on clonidine withdrawal
    Clozapine possibly increased antimuscarinic side-effects when tricyclics given with clozapine

    Avoid concomitant use of clozapine with drugs that have a substantial potential for causing agranulocytosis
    Diltiazem plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly increased by diltiazem
    Disopyramide increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with disopyramide
    Disulfiram metabolism of tricyclics inhibited by disulfiram (increased plasma concentration)
    Diuretics increased risk of postural hypotension when tricyclics given with diuretics
    Entacapone caution with tricyclics advised by manufacturer of entacapone
    Flecainide increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with flecainide
    MAOIs increased risk of hypertension and CNS excitation when tricyclics given with MAOIs , tricyclics should not be started until 2 weeks after stopping MAOIs (3 weeks if starting clomipramine or imipramine), also MAOIs should not be started for at least 1–2 weeks after stopping tricyclics (3 weeks in the case of clomipramine or imipramine)

    For interactions of reversible MAO-A inhibitors (RIMAs) see Moclobemide, and for interactions of MAO-B inhibitors see Selegiline; the antibacterial linezolid is a reversible, non-selective MAO inhibitor
    Methylphenidate metabolism of tricyclics possibly inhibited by methylphenidate
    Moclobemide after stopping tricyclics do not start moclobemide for at least 1 week
    Moxifloxacin increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with moxifloxacin —avoid concomitant use
    Nefopam side-effects possibly increased when tricyclics given with nefopam
    Nicorandil tricyclics possibly enhance hypotensive effect of nicorandil
    Nitrates tricyclics reduce effects of sublingual tablets of nitrates (failure to dissolve under tongue owing to dry mouth)
    Noradrenaline (norepinephrine) increased risk of hypertension and arrhythmias when tricyclics given with noradrenaline (norepinephrine)
    Oestrogens antidepressant effect of tricyclics antagonised by oestrogens (but side-effects of tricyclics possibly increased due to increased plasma concentration)

    Interactions of combined oral contraceptives may also apply to combined contraceptive patches; in case of hormone replacement therapy low dose unlikely to induce interactions
    Opioid Analgesics sedative effects possibly increased when tricyclics given with opioid analgesics
    Phenothiazines increased risk of antimuscarinic side-effects when tricyclics given with phenothiazines
    Phenytoin plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly reduced by phenytoin
    Pimozide increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with pimozide —avoid concomitant use
    Primidone tricyclics antagonises anticonvulsant effect of primidone (convulsive threshold lowered), also metabolism of tricyclics possibly accelerated (reduced plasma concentration)
    Procainamide increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with procainamide
    Propafenone increased risk of arrhythmias when tricyclics given with propafenone
    Quinidine increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with quinidine
    Rifampicin plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly reduced by rifampicin
    Ritonavir plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly increased by ritonavir
    Selegiline CNS toxicity reported when tricyclics given with selegiline

    Selegiline is a MAO-B inhibitor
    Sibutramine increased risk of CNS toxicity when tricyclics given with sibutramine (manufacturer of sibutramine advises avoid concomitant use)
    Sotalol increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with sotalol
    Terfenadine increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with terfenadine —avoid concomitant use
    Thioridazine increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias when tricyclics given with thioridazine —avoid concomitant use
    Thyroid Hormones effects of tricyclics possibly enhanced by thyroid hormones
    Tramadol increased risk of CNS toxicity when tricyclics given with tramadol
    Verapamil plasma concentration of tricyclics possibly increased by verapamil

    Amitriptyline belongs to Antidepressants and will have the following interactions:
    Artemether with Lumefantrine avoidance of antidepressants advised by manufacturer of artemether/lumefantrine
     
  11. Doparius

    Doparius Newbie

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    Fuck yea! Hppy pills kick ass I got mine for insomnia and iI sleep so good,I take 2 25mg pills,! I haenrt slept as good untill I got my amitrptyline.
     
  12. aMorphius

    aMorphius Newbie

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    Another RX sleep aid is the anti-depressant, Trazodone. 50 to 100 mg
    will give you a good night's sleep and there seems to be no tolerence
    problems like you might find with benzos or Ambien.
     
  13. mark_v

    mark_v Newbie

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    I got Trazodone few months back, great sleeping pill !

    I also got some sort of painkiller called Nozinan (Levomepromazine), and works very well as a sleeping aid.
     
  14. Shadow_Addict

    Shadow_Addict Newbie

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    well I was on amatrytiline for about 6months and it did NOTHING whatsoever for me atall....=/ didn't help with the depression/anxiety as it was meant to just no effects..but thats me, everyone is dif I guess [​IMG]
     
  15. peanut butter

    peanut butter Newbie

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    I take amitriptline to help me when I have several nights of poor sleep, which seems to happen quite a bit, and it helps my jaw not hurt, (but since taking these beta blockers my jaw is much better without the elavil) it has however cardiac affects (some people who have it use it to commit suicide by overdosing) when you take to much.





    I beleive it suppresses your breathing and heart, for occassional use it is a great sedative, but for it's antidepressant affects you have to take it for several weeks, I took it for five years for chronic headaches and I never did get used to the sedative affects, spent alot of the five years sleep walking so to speak.[​IMG][​IMG]


    I would however say there is no recreational use for it.
     
  16. BlueMystic

    BlueMystic Gold Member

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    Anitriptalline (Elavil) is an evil drug. Unless it is prescribed to you and works for whatever condition. I would advise anyone against taking it. It has absolutely no recreational value.