Combinations - Antidepressants (lexapro specifically) and meth

Discussion in 'Drug combinations' started by queentigeralyssa2000, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. queentigeralyssa2000

    queentigeralyssa2000 Newbie

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    Another drug interaction question! Does Lexapro block the effects of meth or effect it in any way? Will it cause any form of severe side effects/reactions? Does it not do anything? What does it do? Thank you in advance!
     
  2. ladywolf2012

    ladywolf2012 Got diamonds in the soles of my shoes! Palladium Member Donating Member

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    Your question makes me wonder why you would ask it at all? I suppose that you are already on daily Lexapro (escitalopram) and are wondering what would happen if you took meth too? You can't possible be asking what the effects would be if you took them together for merely recreational purposes--could you?
    Because recreationally, there will be no positive benefits at all that I can think of--the meth would probably totally bury any noticeable effects from the escitalopram, and there would be no advantage at all.

    It is never a good idea to mix drugs, particularly powerful ones like meth. You are ALWAYS taking your chances, and sometimes the risks are huge. In this case, the risk does not seem to be extraordinarily high, but that doesn't mean that there aren't some. One factor I saw mentioned when I researched this issue is that meth tends to cause hyperthermia (super high body temperature) and that the SSRI antidepressants like escitalopram can also cause the same. So you run the risk of dangerously elevated body temperature, with no good way to bring it down. There is also a slight risk of serotonin syndrome--too much serotonin hitting the brain and potentially making you so sick that it can become fatal.

    My advice would be, just don't take these chances. If you must take heavy dangerous drugs like meth, please take it by itself. Just by taking it at all, you are running huge risks. Do you test your drugs before you use them? If you don't, and you get contaminated drugs which are VERY common these days, you may die. Simple as that. Please try to stay safe--we don't want to lose you!
     
  3. queentigeralyssa2000

    queentigeralyssa2000 Newbie

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    I appreciate it. I am very careful with these sort of things, I’m in control of the drug (and not vice versa). I do test my drugs before I take them, absolutely. It would not be smart in the slightest if I didn’t.
     
  4. ladywolf2012

    ladywolf2012 Got diamonds in the soles of my shoes! Palladium Member Donating Member

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    Hi Queen Tiger, and welcome to the Forum.

    You have just earned my unqualified respect by reporting that you do, indeed, test your drugs routinely. You have no idea how rare this is among chronic (or recreational) drug users. We can preach in here until we are blue in the face, but it often feels like totally wasted energy. It's the same thing with urging people to go to hospital emergency rooms, or at least to private doctors. People often come in here on the verge of dying, asking for advice from a bunch of not necessarily qualified people (us), when what they really need is immediate professional medical care. Many drug users are just in total denial of the risks that they have already incurred in their use, and obviously intend to continue incurring. We can't do any more except urge the user to go in for help--sadly, we have no more power than that.

    So is it your situation that you are a steady user of escitalopram, and are wondering if you can "get away with" using some methamphetamine on top of the other drug? What I found when I did my own research for you is that this is not considered to be a terrifically dangerous combination, but that it is risky nonetheless and is not recommended. (Of course, what drug mixing ever is?)

    I guess you pays your money and you takes your chances. Personal safety is, ultimately, going to be your own choice. You apparently aren't considering the very worst possible combination, but again--all combinations are inherently risky, as meth itself alone is also.

    Keep us posted and maybe another chemistry-type from among our experts here will jump in to give more and better advice. @aemetha? @staples Anyone else wise and experienced? Thanks!
     
  5. chibi curmudgeon

    chibi curmudgeon Gold Finger Gold Member Donating Member

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    So unless I missed it somewhere, you didn't mention if you were taking escitalopram medicinally or recreationally; I'm going to guess medicinally, as it doesn't really have any recreational potential.

    Escitalopram is very selective for the serotonin transporter, as an inhibitor (which you probably already know.) Meth inhibits (or reverses!) this transporter as well, so yes, ladywolf is correct about the possibility of serotonin syndrome. It's definitely something to watch out for, but it is not a guaranteed result. My roommate is low-dose tweaking and she takes 80 mg fluoxetine/day--she's a little jittery, but otherwise seems fine. I would avoid dancing or undertaking any other strenuous activity with this combination, as this will also raise your body temperature and heart rate.

    Also, regarding your heart: escitalopram can prolong the QT interval--put simply, it takes longer for the electrical beat impulse to travel through your heart. It would not surprise me if meth does the same. This is usually not a problem for people with no other heart issues. However, if this interval gets to be too long, it kind of confuses your heart and can lead to abnormal rhythms which can kill you. At the very least, have other people around you when you use this combination. Preferably friends who know CPR and won't hesitate to call an ambulance if you show signs of cardiac arrest.

    I wouldn't expect the effects to be blocked in any way, since (unless I'm mistaken) meth inhibits the serotonin transporter via a different mechanism from the way escitalopram inhibits it. While there could be additive effects, like I mentioned above, if I had to guess I'd say meth is just so much more powerful that it would be like shooting someone with both a Howitzer and a BB gun. Technically, the BB will do extra damage, but the magnitude of damage is largely irrelevant.

    Hope this helped!
     
  6. queentigeralyssa2000

    queentigeralyssa2000 Newbie

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    Thank you both! It’s idiotic to not test your drugs before taking them. There’s a reason why people say to test drugs, or a reason why people say to do something.