Oral use - butalbital

Discussion in 'Downers and sleeping pills' started by seth20, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. seth20

    seth20 Newbie

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    a friend of mine just recently got a prescription of bucet.. is there any potenial with this drug.
     
  2. Mike177

    Mike177 Gold Member

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    bucet(Butalbital with Acetaminaphine) is a schedulle 3 barbiturate witch does have recreational potential. Because it containes acetaminaphine (tylenol) watch high doses because high amounts of tylenol hurt and damage the liver. It isnt perscribed like it used to be, but still can be. Butalbital, as i recall, is most perscribed for headaches.
     
  3. Mike177

    Mike177 Gold Member

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    Barbiturates</font>

    During the seventies, the 'barb freak' was probably the most regular punter
    at street drugs agencies like Lifeline. This was because they tended to be
    those drug users who were least able to take care of themselves. Even the
    most desperate bagheads look down upon barb freaks because of the mess that
    they invariably get themselves into.

    Barbiturates are a sedative drug. Normally prescribed to induce sleep,
    their use is now almost completely discontinued for this purpose, though
    milder variants such as phenobarbitone may still be used to manage
    epilepsy. Nevertheless, Barbiturates occasionally turn up from time to
    time, usually as

    Sodium Amytal - most frequently as a bright blue capsule that contains
    60 mg of the drug.

    Seconal - 50 mg orange capsules, and finally

    Tuinal - which are a cocktail of 50 mg of Amytal and 50 mg of Seconal
    which, unsurprisingly perhaps, come in a capsule that is half Amytal blue,
    half Seconal orange. Whoever was responsible for the design of these
    capsules certainly had a flair for marketing substances to junkies and
    hypochondriacs.

    The first thing to get clear about barbiturates is that these things are
    dangerous. I don't mean 'Heroin screws you up' dangerous, I mean seriously
    fucked-up style dangerous. Is that clear enough for you? During the
    seventies, around ? people died every year as a result of barbiturate
    poisoning. Many of those deaths were people who just took the drug to
    sleep.

    The pattern usually went like this. Have a few scoops to help you get your
    head down. Then, drop a couple of nembies and pour yourself another drink
    while you wait for the drug to take effect. After a while, you don't
    remember whether you took the caps or not, so you'd better take a couple
    more to be on the safe side. They'd find your body in the morning. If you
    hadn't choked on your own vomit, your breathing had slowed down
    progressively until it stopped.

    Like opiates, barbiturates are addictive, only more so. Taken to help you
    sleep, after a few days, it becomes impossible to sleep without them. Like
    the opiates, barbituates produce tolerance so that you need to keep upping
    the dose to get the same effect, but the real hum-dinger is the withdrawal
    syndrome. If withdrawal from opiates is cold turkey, then withdrawal from
    barbiturates could be cold raven. Besides the craving, discomfort and
    inability to sleep, barbiturate withdrawal also causes major epileptic
    seizures. Nobody dies from opiate withdrawal, but it is a strong
    possibility with barbiturates and you should only think about it under the
    supervision of a doctor, preferably as a hospital in-patient.

    The possibility of overdose is amplified greatly if barbs are injected into
    a vein rather than taken orally. By and large, it is usually only those
    people who have had their switches set to automatic self-destruct mode who
    use barbiturates because the drug isn't at all pleasant or enjoyable. Barbs
    lack the euphoric content of opiates and the social lubricant properties
    associated with alcohol. They simply produce a dark, blank oblivion and as
    such will always remain popular with those people who hate themselves or
    their lives so much that their behaviour is governed by a compulsion to
    obliterate all possibility of thought and self-examination. Do yourself a
    favour. Just say no.
    --------------------------------------------------------

    This was taken from McDermott's Guide to the Depressant Drugs

    p.s. I dont know about Barbs being more addictive than opiates, this sounds like a bit of an over-statment.
     
  4. seth20

    seth20 Newbie

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    thanks for info