1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP

Cannabis-Smoking Soldiers On Leave to Face Less Scrutiny, Come January

Discussion in 'Article Archive' started by Beenthere2Hippie, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. Beenthere2Hippie

    Beenthere2Hippie The Constant Optimist Palladium Member

    Reputation Points:
    7,430
    Messages:
    6,064
    Joined:
    May 20, 2013
    from U.S.A.
    [​IMG]JERUSALEM– Israel’s army is to relax its disciplinary action against soldiers accused of smoking cannabis while on leave, a general overseeing the reform said Wednesday.

    Offending soldiers will no longer be systematically court marshalled nor receive prison sentences of up to two months, Danny Efroni told military radio. But they must agree to undergo regular tests to show they are abstaining from smoking cannabis.

    The relaxation does not apply to soldiers who use the drug while on duty.

    “We are offering soldiers the chance to continue their service normally and not be imprisoned and hindered by a criminal record in civilian life,” Efroni said.

    Cannabis use is illegal in Israel except for medical purposes. Last year 128 Israeli soldiers were prosecuted for use of narcotics, according to the Haaretz daily. Almost half of the investigations conducted by military police involve drug use.

    The military said in a statement that the new policy would take effect on January 1.

    “The army wants to give a second chance to soldiers who want to complete a proper military service and to return to the right path,” it said.



    Breitbart/Dec. 21, 2016
    http://www.breitbart.com/jerusalem/2016/12/21/israel-ease-punishment-pot-smoking-soldiers/
    Photo: IDF, getty
    Newshawk Crew
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 10, 2017
  2. Beenthere2Hippie

    Beenthere2Hippie The Constant Optimist Palladium Member

    Reputation Points:
    7,430
    Messages:
    6,064
    Joined:
    May 20, 2013
    from U.S.A.
    Editorial Comment: IDF Understands Cannabis Use and Crime Not the Same

    [​IMG]The army’s decision not to launch criminal proceedings against soldiers who occasionally smoke marijuana while off duty (Gili Cohen, Wednesday’s Haaretz) is another step in the right direction by the Israeli authorities.

    The military prosecution’s new enforcement policy states that soldiers who promise to give regular urine samples and complete a one-year probation period won’t be indicted, and the cases against them will be closed. This will enable such soldiers to avoid a criminal record, which could hurt their future employment prospects.

    Despite being opposed by the police and the minister in charge of the force, Gilad Erdan, the Anti-Drug Authority’s recommendation to increase the amount of cannabis an individual can possess to 25 grams, in line with the Portuguese model, goes in the same direction: decriminalizing the use of small quantities of some soft drugs.

    The police oppose this recommendation, on the advice of a committee chaired by the head of its investigations and intelligence department, Meni Itzhaki. Moreover, the minister is planning a series of new appointments at the Anti-Drug Authority that could kill this welcome initiative. Nevertheless, it seems clear which way the wind is blowing, both in Israel and abroad, and some would say the direction is inevitable: legalizing soft drugs, either fully or partially, or at least decriminalizing them, and viewing their use as a social or medical problem rather than a law-enforcement issue.

    In Portugal, responsibility for dealing with marijuana users has been transferred to the Health Ministry. In the United States, eight states have already gone the route of legalization, and dozens have adopted some degree of decriminalization. To these trends we must add the increasingly widespread use of medical marijuana, whose prescription has become part of mainstream medicine and is now legal in 27 U.S. states.

    Erdan and the police must understand that investing resources in chasing after soft-drug “criminals” is the equivalent of throwing public money down the drain. The army has said that about half the Military Police’s intelligence resources are invested in drug offenses, and some 40 percent of all Military Police cases relate to such offenses, which are the most common crime in the army. Even if the proportion in the police is different, a more liberal attitude toward users of soft drugs would enable the force to divert many more resources to more important goals that suffer from under-policing.

    Anyone who has been questioned by the police or had his home raided due to possession of cannabis for personal use is familiar with the problem: The police ride roughshod over people’s privacy and treat them like criminals in every respect. But what happens inside a person’s home, as long as it doesn’t violate the rights of others, shouldn’t bother anyone.

    We must stop taking a stringent criminal approach to people who use cannabis or cannabis products.


    Haaretz Editorial Staff/Dec. 22, 2016
    http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/editorial/1.760569
    Photo: Abir Sultan, flash90
    Newshawk Crew
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 10, 2017