1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
    Dismiss Notice

Effects - Do all pain killers make you drowsy on it

Discussion in 'Opiates & Opioids' started by war209, May 3, 2010.

  1. war209

    war209 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -16
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Male from Canada
    Do all pain killers make you drowsy and give you a hot warm sensation?What are the effects and high like on pain killers.

    Also I hear some are very addicting do to the high.

    Anyone.:crazy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2017
  2. BloodyMuffin

    BloodyMuffin Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    190
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    234
    Male from earth
    Swim's no expert on this matter by any stretch of the imagination, but he'll throw his two cents in. he's taken narcotic painkillers twice in his life, once for a root canal a couple years ago, and once this weekend. as his experience is limited to legitimate medical use this might not be the answer you're looking for, but he feels the experiences of a non recreational user are relevant as well as those of a recreational user.

    he doesnt know what exactly he was given for the root canal, but it was some strong shit. that combined with a benzo and some nitrous had him feeling wacked out all day. he wouldnt say it was the most amazing or addictive experience of his life, but then again he doesnt have a very addictive personality. he pretty much just felt out of it all day and had a very bad memory. no warm fuzzys or anything.

    The one he took this weekend was also for a good reason. he woke up with a killer migrain at a friends house, and after 6 aspirin and 5 hours it simply wouldnt go away. he was planning on a rather eventful night and desperately needed some relief as he couldn't even go home. his friend mentioned that his dad had some painkillers from a kidney stone, so after a bit of an internal debate he decided to take one. it was a darvocet or something like that. he doesnt know the exact dose, but it cured his headache instantly and had none of the effects swiy mentioned, nor any of the effects his previous experience had. it literally only cured the pain. once again, no chance of addiction when used properly, though i suppose if one were going for the high it would be a totally different story.
     
  3. diffs

    diffs Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    284
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Messages:
    302
    Male from U.K.
    No, not all painkillers get you high/drowsy. As far as Swim know's it's only painkillers belonging to the opiate/opioid family (eg codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine to name a few) that will give you the high Swiy is speaking about. Things like paracetamol (acetamenophin), asprin, and NSIAD's (Non Steroidal Anti-Inflamatory Drugs) like ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac wont do anything for you recreationally and shouldn't make one drowsy. Infact taking too much of the non-opiate drugs will probably just give one organ damage (this isn't to say too many opiates wont damage you either)

    The sort of high you get from opiates depends on what and how much you take, but can include euphoria, relaxation/sedation, warmth, happiness and just a genral good feeling. On the flip side there can be plenty of negative side effects from taking opiates which include, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, anxiety, and constipation to name a few.

    If Swiy is thinking of going down the opiate route think carefully first and if one chooses to try it be careful. They are no joke. It is so easy to get addicted to the painkillers, even weak ones like codeine. Its so easy. Its happened to Swim and im sure its happened to plenty of people on this forum. You try it once and enjoy, you have it again and enjoy it. Then you maybe start doin it every weekend. Then it starts every few days because you enjoy it so much. Before you know it one is taking them every day. Tolerance develops very quickly and you just end up taking more and more.

    Trying to give up, once one has an addiction is no joke. Withdrawal symptoms are no joke. Addiction can take over ones life and what was once fun can turn into a nightmare.

    Swim isn't trying to preach or tell Swiy what to do, even though this post seems to have turned into a bit of a lecture. Swim just trying to giving a warning about how easy it can turn from having a bit of fun with painkillers to turning nasty, and doesn't want to see other people go down the route swim has.

    If Swiy does decide to try, be carefull and stay safe

    Oh and just to add, The above post says if narcotic (opiate) painkillers are used properly, one cant get addicted. This may be true if they are only used for a very short length of time. If they are used every day over a long period of time, the body will become dependant on them. Swim has heard of people who have been on painkillers for a year or so and only taken as directed by a doctor(eg. 1or2 every 4hrs etc) and once they stopped they have experienced withdrawal symptoms. Also when on painkillers for long periods of time, tolerance develops and the dose sometimes has to be increased as the body gets used to the drugs in the system and they dont have the same effect. When people have been on narcotic painkillers for a long time, they are usually tapered off. This means that the dose is slowly reduced over a few weeks/months so the body doesnt go into withdrawal.

    Anyway, Swim thinks he has said enough on the matter now lol
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
  4. DextroClonazyCodone

    DextroClonazyCodone Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    138
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    413
    Male
    SWIM wouldn't say that all of the opioids (SWIM assumes you mean these instead of 'painkillers') made him drowsy, but all of them altered his consciousness enough that he noticed. He can still drive if he takes 50mg Tramadol (a very non-sedating opioid-like drug), but still feels inherently different than when he is sober. Generally, SWIM just refers to this feeling as "opiated" or something like that. It is unique to those substances.
     
  5. Squidward

    Squidward Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    37
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Male from U.S.A.
    The effects of opiates/oids vary greatly from person to person. SWIM's therapist says that a stimulating, at least mentally, or energizing effect, is noted in those who have an actual lack of endorphins not resulting from Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome. Of course, the general action of most of these is that they will cause you to enter a "nod" when the proper dosage is taken, but SWIM has met people who have never experienced a nod even when taking large doses of opiates.
     
  6. war209

    war209 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -16
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Male from Canada
    so only the narcotic pain killers codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine ? The none narcotic pain killers will not give any high?

    And only the narcotic pain killers can be addictive.
     
  7. Squidward

    Squidward Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    37
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Male from U.S.A.
    There are more narcotic painkillers than that, but that is a general overview of the opiate subsection. Narcotics are not only opiates, but any sleep compelling drug. Also, habituation to any kind of painkiller can develop, bust most of the time it won't be as severe. If one took acetaminophen every day then it is likely they would experience discomfort if they stopped abruptly.

    Also, please be more specific with what SWIY means by painkiller. Does this include any kind of anesthetics? If so, there are a whole lot of other ones drugs that fall into this category.
     
  8. diffs

    diffs Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    284
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Messages:
    302
    Male from U.K.
    There are more opiate (narcotic) painkillers available than those swim quoted, he just named a few as an example. Check out some search engines if you want to know all the opiate painkillers that there are.

    As far as swim knows, only painkillers belonging to the opiate/opioid family can be physically addictive.

    Some people can develop a psychological dependence on any drugs. This means that even if the drug is not technically classed as addictive, the person taking it may not feel well unless they take it, but there will be no physical withdrawal symptoms, as such.

    Swim had a friend who would wake up and need to take a paracetamol (acetaminophen) every morning or he would get a headache.He would get up and take 1 or 2 just incase, even if he felt fine, but if he didn't do it he would develope a headache. Swim thinks that this was all in his friends (excuse the pun) head.

    But anyway to answer your question, which swim thinks he answered in his previous post the non narcotic/opiate painkillers shouldn't be addictive and they wont get you 'high'

    Good luck, stay safe.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
  9. war209

    war209 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -16
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Male from Canada
    Why is that?
     
  10. Squidward

    Squidward Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    37
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Male from U.S.A.
    That is false. Any kind of drug can be physically addictive, and this includes all painkillers. Now, the degree of addiction can vary greatly, but it is dependance nonetheless. The key word here is allostasis. One of the primary functions of the nervous system is to maintain homeostasis, which means to keep everything going on in the body within the required levels. An example would be glucose and insulin. If there is a lot of glucose in the blood, then insulin will be released to process it. However, when someone consumes a drug, they are altering the levels of chemicals within their body, and if they consistently do so, the body will perform allostasis, which is to change the chemical level so that it is back in the normal range again. Thus, when the drug ceases to be administered, the body will have a deficiency of whatever chemical was being altered by the drug. This is a basic physiological overview of addiction.

    In conclusion, any pain-killer can be addictive, but the degree to which it is difficult to break the addiction and the degree to which it affects your everyday life vary greatly between drugs.
     
  11. High :D

    High :D Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -4
    Joined:
    May 4, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    26 y/o Male from U.S.A.
    Swim has never been addicted to anything but he will not lie, oxycotin is the one drug he could do all day, he has to fight to stop himself from getting more and more.
     
  12. BBGONE

    BBGONE Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    84
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Male
    No, at first onset opiates can give energy and talkativeness.
    After the first onset goes off it is usually replaced by dreamy state.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2011
  13. dyingtomorrow

    dyingtomorrow Palladium Member R.I.P.

    Reputation Points:
    3,788
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    2,581
    Male from U.S.A.
    SWIM thinks it has to do with dose.

    In SWIM's experience with heroin, oxycodone and vicodin, low doses give a stimulating effect. SWIM notices with vicodin for instance, which is a very weak opiate, that taking a couple will give him much greater stamina and energy. On the other hand, high doses of heroin of course make him completely nod out.
     
  14. war209

    war209 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -16
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Male from Canada
    I think what he is saying is painkillers that are belonging to the opiate or opiate is what gives the hot warm coffy pleasurable feel the rush.Has non opiate painkillers and also sedatives will make you drowsy ,calm , relaxed !!But with out the hot warm coffy pleasurable feel .
     
  15. sideaffects

    sideaffects Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -2
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    48 y/o Male from U.K.
    i dont really know but 30/500 cocods are preety addicting let me tell ya
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2017
  16. war209

    war209 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    -16
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Male from Canada


    Is your reply a reply to my post above or are you replying to some one else in this thread.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2017
  17. .:.Somnolence.:.

    .:.Somnolence.:. Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    5
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Male from earth
    You can get addicted to anything, wether it's popping T3's, drinking opium teas or shooting morphine. Of course addiction is possible for anything. painkillers make you feel more "alive" than drowsy. When swim thinks of drowsy he thinks of a crappy alcohol buzz or too many benzos. Nodding on opiates is gorgeous.
     
  18. Babychic01

    Babychic01 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    382
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2010
    Messages:
    227
    Female from ireland
    SWIM has a long history with having to use prescribed painkillers and apologises in advance for a long post but in answer to the OP question she thought maybe highlighting the difference in the type of painkillers would be helpful.

    Analgesics are a class of drugs used to relieve pain. The pain relief induced by analgesics occurs either by blocking pain signals going to the brain or by interfering with the brain's interpretation of the signals, without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness. There are basically two kinds of analgesics: narcotics and non narcotics.

    Narcotics
    There are two types of narcotic analgesics: the opiates and the opioids (derivatives of opiates). Opiates are the alkaloids found in opium (a white liquid extract of unripe seeds of the poppy plant).

    Opioid intoxication can be defined as...
    Opium and its forms (which include morphine, heroin, oxycodone, and the synthetic opioid narcotics) lead to an abnormal mental state, which generally involves excessive sleepiness or unconsciousness.

    Opioids are any medication which bind to opioid receptors in the central nervous system or gastointestinal tract. According to Wikipedia, there are four broad classes of opioids:

    •Endogenous opioid peptides (produced in the body: endorphins, dynorphins, enkephalins)
    •Opium alkaloids (morphine, codeine, thebaine)
    •Semi-synthetic opioids (heroin, oxycodone, hydrocodone, dihydrocodeine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, nicomorphine)
    •Fully synthetic opioids (pethidine or Demerol, methadone, fentanyl, propoxyphene, pentazocine, buprenorphine, butorphanol, tramadol, and more)

    Opioids are used in medicine as strong analgesics, for relief of severe or chronic pain. Interestingly, there is no upper limit for the dosage of opioids used to achieve pain relief, but the dose must be increased gradually to allow for the development of tolerance to adverse effects (for example, respiratory depression). Some people with intense pain get such high doses that the same dose would be fatal if taken by someone who was not suffering from pain.

    There have been debates over the addictive potential of opioids vs. the benefit of their analgesic properties for treating non-malignant chronic pain, such as chronic arthritis. Some experts believe opioids can be taken safely for years with minimal risk of addiction or toxic side effects. The enhanced quality of life which opioids may provide the must be considered.

    Opiates have become popular as people have heard about the sleepiness, the "warm, nice feeling" but it wont be long until they are needing larger and more frequent usage of the substance to sustain that feeling..leading to addiction.

    Side Effects / Adverse Reactions of Opioids:

    Common side effects and adverse reactions:
    •nausea
    •vomiting
    •drowsiness
    •dry mouth
    •miosis (contraction of the pupil)
    •orthostatic hypotension (blood pressure lowers upon sudden standing)
    •urinary retention
    •constipation and/or fecal impaction

    Less common side effects and adverse reactions:
    •confusion
    •hallucinations
    •delirium
    •hives
    •itch
    •hypothermia
    •bradycardia (slow heart rate)
    •tachycardia (rapid heart rate)
    •raised intracranial pressure
    •ureteric or biliary spasm
    •muscle rigidity
    •flushing

    Most severe side effects and adverse reactions:
    •respiratory depression
    •fatal overdose


    Non Narctoics
    Drugs that have principally analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory actions. They do not bind to opioid receptors and are not classified under the Controlled Substances Act. For example, Aspirin, Paracetemol, Acetaminophen Acephen, Actamin, Feverall, Q-Pap, Tactinal, Tempra, Tylenol, Uniserts, Vitapap) etc. There are many brands and forms of acetaminophen available. This drug is available without a prescription. Acetaminophen—or APAP—is sold under various brand names, including Tylenol, Panadol, Aspirin Free Anacin, and Bayer Select Maximum Strength Headache Pain Relief Formula. Many multi-symptom cold, flu, and sinus medicines also contain acetaminophen. Check the ingredients listed on the container to see if acetaminophen is included in the product. It is the most commonly used over-the-counter, non-narcotic analgesic. Acetaminophen is a popular pain-reliever because it is both effective for mild to moderate pain relief and relatively inexpensive. It must be emphasized though that the safety of acetaminophen is tied to proper use of the drug (use according to specific prescribing instructions). If acetaminophen is not used according to the directions on the label, serious side effects and possible fatal consequences can occur. For example, taking more than 4000 mg/day or using it longterm can increase the risk of liver damage. The risk of liver damage with acetaminophen use is also increased by ingesting alcohol.

    Many people do not realize that acetaminophen is found in more than 600 over-the-counter drugs. It can be found in combination with other active ingredients in many cold, sinus, and cough medications. The cumulative effect of acetaminophen must be considered if you are talking multiple drugs which contain acetaminophen.

    There are few serious side effects associated with the safe use of non-narcotic analgesics. However, people taking them should be aware of potential interactions with other medications. See the doctor if any of the following side effects are displayed:

    hives
    itching
    bruising
    fever
    sore throat

    Acetaminophen can be highly toxic.
    Medical help should be sought immediately if an overdose is taken. Severe signs of overdose may not occur for 2 to 4 days, symtoms displayed:

    yellow skin or eyes
    bloody urine
    black stool
    decreased urine output
    overdose can result in liver toxicity or liver failure


    Early treatment may prevent liver damage or even death.

    As much as these type of pankillers are deemed non-addictive:
    Psychological addiction can also occur with these types of painkillers and this happens when the cravings for a drug are psychological or emotional. People who are psychologically addicted feel overcome by the desire to have a drug. They may lie or steal to get it. This can also be applied to those taking narcotic painkillers too. A person crosses the line between abuse and addiction when he or she is no longer trying the drug to have fun or get high, but has come to depend on it. His or her whole life centers around the need for the drug. An addicted person — whether it's a physical or psychological addiction or both — no longer feels like there is a choice in taking a substance. Addiction means a person has no control over whether he or she uses a drug or drinks. Someone who's addicted to for example, cocaine, has grown so used to the drug that he or she has to have it. Addiction can be physical, psychological, or both.


    Stay safe! :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2010
  19. ScorpioSunshine

    ScorpioSunshine Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    143
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    205
    Female from U.S.A.
    ^^this^^

    Hydrocodone definitely gives swim energy, makes her chatty, and feels very stmulating; this is especially true if she hasn't had a break from it.

    But the times when she hasn't had any in a long time, more than likely the first few doses make her feel somnolent, relaxed, even noddy.

    Heroin sometimes gave swim some energy, but not the same as hydrocodone, and more often than not it just made her cheery and noddy.

    (Not that swim isn't normally cheery, hehe!)
     
  20. corky616

    corky616 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Male from U.K.
    Blue only gets drowsey after strong doses of any opiate. He normally gets the effect he looking for after taking 1-2 times the recomended dose for pain management. The effect he is looking for is euphoria and a mood lift without any nausa or serious impairment.