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Addiction - Do you think that prescribed users have a higher risk for developing adderall addiction?

Discussion in 'Adderall' started by Alfa, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. Alfa

    Alfa Productive Insomniac Staff Member Administrator

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    I encountered this interesting post:
    What do you think about this?
    Do you think that prescribed users have a higher risk for developing adderall addiction?
     
  2. Stevotwentyfive

    Stevotwentyfive Silver Member

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    I would agree. I know for myself that being prescribed adderall I initially took it correctly for a number of years. It was the wearing off effect of the adderall that I felt after my tolerance grew that gave me the urge to take more than I was prescribed in a day. After that one extra pill a day I slowly increased up to taking a month supply in less than a week.

    Having the supply of scripts coming from the doctor, and being able to keep my availability was a factor in eventually addiction, but I would have to think that other reasons were more at fault. Such as my depression, and lack of coping skills in what was my then current situation in life. I went from simply treating ADHD to trying to cover up my depressed feelings and unhappiness in who I was.
     
  3. Alfa

    Alfa Productive Insomniac Staff Member Administrator

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    I added a poll.
     
  4. aemetha

    aemetha Insomniac Member Silver Member Donating Member

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    I think it's a difficult question to answer because there are so many definitions of addiction, and from a strictly clinical perspective it could be argued that prescribed users are less likely to become addicted due to certain diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders having an exclusion for prescribed users.

    There is also the issue that addiction is generally considered to be more than simply needing the drug, it also has to cause some kind of distress or impairment, otherwise it's not a problem. In the case of a prescribed user that often is not the case, and in fact the substance may correct some kind of distress or impairment. The argument made in the originally quoted text is that the easy availability makes addiction more of a risk, which applies to the first part of the addiction dynamic (needing it), but the easy availability of it removes many barriers that users face leading to distress of impairment for the second part of the dynamic.

    The other argument however, is that from a purely motivational perspective, prescribed users may have greater motivation to seek the drug out. If we assume that a recreational user is motivated only by hedonism, and a prescribed user is motivated in part by hedonism and in part by the necessity of it for unimpaired functioning, they obviously have more incentive to seek it out.

    So I don't really know. I'm on the fence, I think the arguments for and against the proposition are both compelling.
     
  5. idfma

    idfma Titanium Member Donating Member

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    Easy (or easier) access to something makes it more likely it will become a habit regardless of what that thing is. In the case of drugs, I think it definitely increases the likelihood of addiction. From there, the definition of addiction does matter, and I won't be the one to open that can of worms, but regular and easy access to it definitely increases one's odds of using it excessively if only because there is more opportunity to do so.
    --- Double Post Merged, Jun 11, 2017 ---
    Oh, and since the question doesn't specify, you can also argue that having a scrip and sharing it with others increases the risk to those without a prescription because they know someone else who has one. That is another way a prescription to adderall could result in a higher risk of addiction.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2017
  6. staples

    staples Gold Member

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    To @aemetha's point, there seem to be many factors, one popular factor is when a patient had been diagnosed and treated:

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00787-010-0140-6
     
  7. Traceur

    Traceur Silver Member

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    I believe there is way too many factors not being taken into account in the discussion so far. I know of 2 people with 30 count 30mg amphetamine prescriptions that safely space out abuse nights, and dont take them daily ever, as prescribed.
    I also know of three that insufflate and ingest their whole month supply in one- two weeks. Each individual has so many confounders; like genetic substance abuse predisposition, social class, human interactivity, education, and some couldn't handle negative effects of long use, while some could.
     
  8. idfma

    idfma Titanium Member Donating Member

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    Fair enough, Traceur, but we're talking about risk rather than absolutes. You're right: there are some people who don't get addicted with scrips, but the survey/question is about whether the risk is higher that addiction occurs with those who have prescriptions. Also, to an extent you are supporting the theory that, yes, the risk is higher, because even if the 2 people you know 'safely space out abuse', abuse is a huge risk factor in addiction--those in the addiction industry (which I am not one), would tell you that's exactly the way to get addicted to something--it always begins with abuse (your word). And the other two, who blow (sorry, couldn't resist the pun) through their supply quickly, they may not be 'addicted', if they leave it at that until they get their next scrip filled. That's 'just' abuse too (depending on your definition)--not addiction, if they wait until their next fill to do it over again.

    So...totally agree that it is definitely going to vary by person and situation, but what do you think about the risk of addiction--is it higher or lower for those who have prescriptions, and therefore regular, legal access?
     
  9. FalcoHere

    FalcoHere Silver Member

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    I think prescribed users that browse a forum mainly dedicated to recreational drug use have a higher chance of abusing their meds, but people who aren't interested in recreational drug use aren't likely to abuse their meds. I know for ADHD meds users have a higher chance of not taking their meds than abusing them, at least according to my doctor.