gbl a depressent?

Discussion in 'GHB' started by poison1981, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. poison1981

    poison1981 Mercury Member

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    Is gbl a depressent like booze

    Has anyone noticed the day after they do gbl they actually feel engergized and productive?

    Unlike booze which the day after leaves u deprssed and feeling HORRIBLE

    I dont understand why gbl does that

    SWim took gbl the other night and is so energetic productive at work today

    its like caffeine but WITHOUT THe anxiety
     
  2. ~lostgurl~

    ~lostgurl~ Platinum Member & Advisor Donating Member

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    Yes GBL is a depressant, though it is not really similar to booze. GBL has a short half life so it does not directly affect ones mood the following day, but if used for sleep, it does help induce REM, which could easily result in You feeling energised and productive the following day as long as You is does not have any physical dependence to it. GHB is prescribed to people with narcolepsy for this reason (REM sleep)
     
  3. MrG

    MrG Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Actually Xyrem is prescribed for narcoleptics to induce deep sleep, which is much better than the usual REM based sleep that they usually end up having.

    Deep Sleep (non-REM sleep) is the most important stage of your sleep because this is when your body recovers, restores, repairs, and heals.
    And that's why this stage of sleep is also known as "Restorative Sleep".



    In order to understand the basics of narcolepsy, it is important to first review the features of "normal sleep." Sleep happens in cycles. When we fall asleep, we initially enter a light stage of sleep and then progress into increasingly deeper stages. Both light and deep sleep stages are called non-REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. After about 90 minutes, we enter the first stage of REM sleep, which is the dreaming portion of sleep, and throughout the night we alternate between stages of REM and non-REM sleep. For people with narcolepsy, sleep begins almost immediately with REM sleep and fragments of REM occur involuntarily throughout the waking hours.
     
  4. ~lostgurl~

    ~lostgurl~ Platinum Member & Advisor Donating Member

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    GHB is used to increase both REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS).
    Almost all other hypnotic compounds available to us suppress REM and SWS, thus GHB produces a more "natural" sleep architecture.

    Below is an article explaining the REM sleep triggering mechanisms involved with GHB administration:

    REM sleep triggering mechanisms involved with GHB administration

    Our results show that the doses of GHB which stimulate the firing of DA neurons of the VTA are in the same range as those capable of inducing REM sleep both in rats and in humans. Given that the stimulation of the mesencephalic dopaminergic nuclei is known to inhibit dorsal raphe nucleus neurons, it is possible that low activating doses of GHB trigger REM sleep by an inhibition of dorsal raphe (REM-off) neurons due to increased DA release from VTA terminals. However, an additional but not incompatible hypothesis is proposed here. It is known that while GHB has no effects on brain acetylcholine (ACh) levels per se, it potentiates increases of ACh induced by neuroleptics such as clozapine and chlorpromazine in the striatum. We raise here the possibility that GHB could potentiate the already increased ACh (REM-on) neurotransmission that occurs just before natural REM sleep, therefore precipitating its onset. In support of this possibility is the fact that GHB was shown to induce REM sleep in the cat only when it was administered at a time close enough to the onset of the next expected REM sleep period. Accordingly, GHB was also shown to potentiate REM sleep-triggering mechanisms in human cases where REM sleep was already facilitated such as in patients with depression or narcolepsy.

    http://www.sro.org/bin/article.dll?paper&1425&&
     
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