Hibiscus. . .?

Discussion in 'Ethnobotanicals' started by scyrusurcys, Dec 4, 2004.

  1. scyrusurcys

    scyrusurcys Silver Member

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    Has anyone ever tried and Hibiscus flowers? If so, how do you use it? I've read that it's mixed with tea to soothe glandular problems (sore throat, fever, etc.). Can you smoke this flower? What are its other effects? Thanks!
     
  2. OneDiaDem

    OneDiaDem Nefelibata Platinum Member

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    Hibiscus Flowers Fight Heart Disease and LDL Levels
    According to a study performed by Shan Medical University's Institute of Biochemistry in Taiwan, extract from the hibiscus flower (Hibiscus sabdariffa) lowers both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the risk of heart disease. These results were published in the September 15th issue of the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. Dr. Chau-Jong Wang and his colleagues suspect that the high antioxidant content contained in the hibiscus extract contributes to the lowered LDL levels noted in the experiment.

    For the experiment, Wang and colleagues divided rats up into three groups, according to the atherosclerosis-inducing diet they were to be placed on. One group was placed on a high cholesterol diet, while the second group was placed on a high fructose diet. High glucose levels are thought to increase triglyceride levels, contributing to the fact of why diabetics are more susceptible to higher cholesterol levels and heart disease.
    Some groups containing each diet were supplemented with hibiscus extract to see whether or not it had any affect on their cholesterol levels. According to the results, both groups saw a surprising decrease in low density lipoproteins upon the administration of hibiscus flower extract. Additionally, the rats consuming a high fructose diet also saw a decrease in triglyceride levels. It is thought that the antioxidant chemicals, such as flavonoids, polyphenolics and anthocyanins, contained in the flower play a large role in preventing the oxidation of low density lipoproteins (the “bad cholesterol”). This oxidation is what contributes to atherosclerosis, the build up of a waxy plaque on the walls of arteries.

    Does the news that hibiscus flower extract actually has some therapeutic value surprise scientists? Not really. Hibiscus flower extract has been used in many folk remedies for liver disorders and high blood pressure. However, this is the first piece of research that establishes the healthy benefits of consuming hibiscus.

    Hibiscus esculentus (Okra); Antitussive, Demulcent
    Hibiscus palustris (Marsh Hibiscus); Antitussive,
    Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (Rose of China); Astringent
    Hibiscus sabdariffa (Guinea sorrel); Diuretic
    Hibiscus tiliaceus (Corkwood); Antitussive,
    Hibiscus trionum (Flower of an Hour); Antitussive

    Red Hibiscus blossoms, high in vitamin C, yield a tonic that is said to soothe colds and coughs. Some Haitians steep 3 fresh chou blak flowers in hot water for 5 minutes. Filipinos place 10 dried blossoms in 2 cups of water and boil down to 1 cup for a cold remedy. Cubans steep 3 green leaves for 5 minutes to calm the nerves.

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  3. scyrusurcys

    scyrusurcys Silver Member

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    Wow, thanks OneDiaDem. That clears up a lot that I had been wondering.