Hop & St. John’s Wort

Discussion in 'Ethnobotanicals' started by jarka, Oct 12, 2004.

  1. jarka

    jarka Gold Member

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    Hi,

    I'm curious if anyone had tried hop (humulus lupulus)?



    Hop (Humulus Lupulus)

    Hops (humulus lupulus) belongs to a genus in the cannabinaceae family. It is a twining, hardy, herbaceous perennial, indigenous to Europe and best known as the main ingredient of beer and ale.

    Contains lupuline: a resinous powder chemically related to THC.



    Effects

    Gives mild cannabis-like high with relaxing qualities.



    Usage

    Can be extracted into alcohol or made as tea.





    Warning

    According to one report, excessive use over a long period may cause dizziness, mental stupor and mild jaundice symptoms in some individuals.



    ---



    And I also want to gain some information about St. John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum). What is the best way of using it?



    St. John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum)

    St. John's wort (hypericum perforatum) is one of the oldest known herbal remedies. It has been used for over 2000 years to treat emotional and nervous complaints. It grows throughout Europe, Western Asia and North Africa. In Europe it is a common weed seen by roadsides, on heathland and in woods. The active substance of St. John's wort is hypericine.





    Effects

    St. John’s wort is used to improve and calm your state of mind. It also purifies the skin and has a positive influence on the stomach. The effects are slow, but durable, when using regularly.



    Usage

    Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the dried herb and leave to infuse for 10-15 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. Do not exceed the recommended dosage.



    Warning

    St. John’s wort can negatively influence the effect of certain medicines. St. John’s wort enhances the effect of the liver enzyme cytochrome P450. This causes some medicines to be broken down faster, making them less effective.



    When combining a medicine with St. John’s wort you are advised to consult your physician or your thrombosis prevention unit for information whether the combination can lead to such an interaction. This is the case not only if you want to start combining St. John’s wort, but also when you want to stop combining St. John’s wort with one of the types of medicine listed below:



    It has been observed that St. John’s wort can reduce the effect of the following medicines:



    * immune system inhibitors, for instance against transplant rejections and auto-immune diseases: cyclosporine

    * anticoagulants of the coumarine type, such as acenocoumarol (Sintrom etc.) and phenprocoumon (Marcumar etc.)

    * Anticonvulsants: phenobarbital and phenytoine

    * bronchodilators: theophylline

    * cardiac glycosides for heart defects and heart rhythm disturbances: digoxin

    * HIV-virus inhibitors: indinavir



    St. John’s wort can also influence the effect of SSRI-type antidepressants. The combination is discouraged.



    An incidental case of break through bleeding has been observed with the simultaneous use of St. John’s wort and certain types of the birth control pill (the combination of ethinyloestradiol and desogestrel, also known as sub-50). When a break through bleeding occurs, it may result in reduced protection against pregnancy.



    Thanks in advance..
     
  2. jarka

    jarka Gold Member

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    Sorry for doublepost but has anyone tried calamus (acorus calamus) a.k.a. sweet flag?



    Calamus (Acorus Calamus) a.k.a. Sweet Flag

    Sweet flag (acorus calamus) belongs to the arum family. The plant looks like reed, it is common throughout North America, Europe and Asia, where it grows on riverbanks and in swamps. After the harvest the roots are dried. It has been used as a flavoring of liqueurs and as a medicine for many purposes. As a stimulant, a mouth wash, painkiller, a remedy against asthma and bronchitis, a rejuvenation tonicum and to increase potency and memory, or for plain enjoyment.

    The major component of sweet flag is asarone, which can be purified into the amphetamine TMA-2.



    Effects

    The most important effect of the herb is that it is stimulating and cheering and that it has a positive effect on the libido.

    A small dose has a slight euforic effect, higher dosages may cause a hallucinating effect. Dr. Shulgin describes TMA-2 in his book 'Pihkal' as comparable to mescaline, though without the colour-intensification.



    Usage

    Chewing sweet flag has a refreshing effect on your breath. When you make tea of it, use 2 to 5 teaspoons, depending on the desired effect. For a light euphoric, stimulating effect, use 1 or 2 teaspoons, for hallucinations use 4 to 5 teaspoons.



    For a stimulating effect soak 20 grams (aprox. 1 oz) Sweet flag in half a litre water and boil it for a while. Sift it and drink a few cups. On an empty stomach it has a stronger effect. For a strong consiousness-expanding effect you can raise the dosage.



    You can combine sweet flag with guarana, kolanut and other stimulating herbs.



    Warning

    Do not combine sweet flag with MAO inhibitors like yohimbe. Look for more information on the page about MAO inhibitors.



    I just found out that this herb grows in my country..

    Has anyone tried it? What it's like?



    TY,

    jarka
     
  3. Alfa

    Alfa Productive Insomniac Staff Member Administrator

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    Hop is available here in an oil. You can add it to a cigarette and smoke it. Ittastes very nasty and the effect is mild. I do not know aboutdrinking it as tea.


    For more info on st. Johnsworth, use the search engine. The tea tastes good.


    Calamus is a mild, but nice psychoactive euphoric stimulant. I use powdered calamus mixed with fruit juice. It's a bit sandy that way, but easy to get down. High doses of calamus are problematic for the liver. The liver converts asarone to TMA-2.
     
  4. psyko_tripper

    psyko_tripper Newbie

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    "The liver converts asarone to TMA-2."


    Are you sure of that Alfa? I always heard that the body was incapable of converting asarone to tma-2. If it's thrue then you can perhaps take a large amount of asarone and have a tma-2 trip. This would be very nice. :)
     
  5. jarka

    jarka Gold Member

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    Oh, okay.. I'll try to pulverize my calamus.

    I bought 22grams of calamus for ~1$ some time ago from a local drugstore. I made tea out of ~10 grams and felt no effects - only bad taste of the tea.