Question - How long should I stop smoking for?

Discussion in 'Cannabis' started by RS96, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. RS96

    RS96 Newbie

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    Ok, so here's the deal.

    I've been smoking everyday since my senior year of high school - going on 4 years now. I started off smoking a bowl or two at night, but after I graduated I quickly started smoking all day, everyday. After about a year of doing this I stopped getting high, but couldn't not smoke because basically, I needed it to function.

    When I met my ex-boyfriend 2 1/2 years ago, he introduced me to dabbing and that quickly became my go-to way to smoke. Even when I dabbed though it wasn't like I was getting high - just like a buzz sort of.

    Anyway, I finally found the willpower to take a T break and I'm going on a week clean. My question is - how long do you think I should break so that I can get high again? A month? Two months?
     
  2. aemetha

    aemetha Sexy Potato Palladium Member Donating Member

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    I've read some studies on tolerance (not cannabis specifically, but some of the mechanisms involved are similar) that suggest that tolerance is not a single phenomenon, but rather something that happens via a few different mechanisms that each have a varying duration. As an example, one of the identified tolerance mechanism is less physiological and more psychological insofar as people psychologically adjust to getting high. The chemical effect on the brain with regard to this particular aspect is irrelevant, because it's not that the person isn't high, it's just that they don't really notice because it has become normalised. Resetting this kind of tolerance varies by individuals, but around 6 weeks is probably when you'll begin to notice an effect.

    Other kinds of tolerance involve neural plasticity, which can take much longer to reset. Neural plasticity describes how the brain forms new synapses and prunes unused ones in an effort to adjust to its circumstances. When you spend a large amount of time high, the brain adjusts in this way to being high and this is expressed in part as tolerance and dependence. Neural plasticity can take a long time to reset. For example, consider how long it took to adjust your brain to the state it is now, four years you say. Now consider that plasticity tends to slow down in some aspects as we age. You should therefore be looking at a minimum of four years to really see anything close to your baseline beginning tolerance. This is of course a gradual process, and if baseline isn't your goal you can probably expect to see some lesser improvement in a shorter time frame.

    So basically, in the time frames you've given you can expect to see some resetting of tolerance, but not a complete reset if that is what you're hoping for.
     
  3. RS96

    RS96 Newbie

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    Wow! Thank you for the info. It is extremely helpful and makes a lot of sense. I'm going to break for a couple months and see how high I get.