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Drug info - Inhalants

Discussion in 'Various drugs not covered by other forums' started by masmith31593, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. masmith31593

    masmith31593

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    swim cannot post wiki articles. so swim thought he would post all of his compiled information about inhalants here. swim has never tried inhalants aside from nitrous oxide. swim personally suggests the majority of swimmers avoid this class of drug of abuse. there are a lot safer ways to get a better high in swim's opinion

    Inhalants are a diverse group of volatile substances whose chemical vapors can be inhaled to produce psychoactive (mind-altering) effects. While other abused substances can be inhaled, the term “inhalants” is used to describe substances that are rarely, if ever, taken by any other route of administration. A variety of products common in the home and workplace contain substances that can be inhaled to get high; however, people do not typically think of these products (e.g., spray paints, glues, and cleaning fluids) as drugs because they were never intended to induce intoxicating effects. Yet young children and adolescents can easily obtain these extremely toxic substances and are among those most likely to abuse them. In fact, more 8th-graders have tried inhalants than any other illicit drug.

    Types of Inhalants

    Volatile solvents—liquids that vaporize at room temperature
    -Industrial or household products, including paint thinners or removers, degreasers, dry-cleaning fluids, gasoline, and lighter fluid
    -Art or office supply solvents, including correction fluids, felt-tip marker fluid, electronic contact cleaners, and glue

    Aerosols—sprays that contain propellants and solvents
    -Household aerosol propellants in items such as spray paints, hair or deodorant sprays, fabric protector sprays, aerosol computer cleaning products, and vegetable oil sprays

    Gases—found in household or commercial products and used as medical anesthetics
    -Household or commercial products, including butane lighters and propane tanks, whipped cream aerosols or dispensers, and refrigerant gases
    -Medical anesthetics, such as ether, chloroform, halothane, and nitrous oxide

    Nitrites—a special class of inhalants that are used primarily as sexual enhancers
    -Organic nitrites are volatiles that include cyclohexyl, butyl, and amyl nitrites, commonly known as “poppers.” Amyl nitrite is still used in certain diagnostic medical procedures. When marketed for illicit use, organic nitrites are often sold in small brown bottles labeled as “video head cleaner,” “room odorizer,” “leather cleaner,” or “liquid aroma.”

    these products contain a wide variety of chemicals such as:

    • toluene (spray paints, rubber cement, gasoline),
    • chlorinated hydrocarbons (dry-cleaning chemicals, correction fluids),
    • hexane (glues, gasoline),
    • benzene (gasoline),
    • methylene chloride (varnish removers, paint thinners),
    • butane (cigarette lighter refills, air fresheners), and
    • nitrous oxide (whipped cream dispensers, gas cylinders).
    +Inhalants are used by breathing through the nose or mouth, although there is several ways to accomplish this.

    Effects

    The effects of inhalants are similar to those of alcohol, including slurred speech, lack of coordination, euphoria, and dizziness. Inhalant abusers may also experience lightheadedness, hallucinations, and delusions. With repeated inhalations, many users feel less inhibited and less in control. Some may feel drowsy for several hours and experience a lingering headache. Chemicals found in different types of inhaled products may produce a variety of additional effects, such as confusion, nausea, or vomiting.
    By displacing air in the lungs, inhalants deprive the body of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia. Hypoxia can damage cells throughout the body, but the cells of the brain are especially sensitive to it. The symptoms of brain hypoxia vary according to which regions of the brain are affected: for example, the hippocampus helps control memory, so someone who repeatedly uses inhalants may lose the ability to learn new things or may have a hard time carrying on simple conversations.
    Long-term inhalant abuse can also break down myelin, a fatty tissue that surrounds and protects some nerve fibers. Myelin helps nerve fibers carry their messages quickly and efficiently, and when damaged, can lead to muscle spasms and tremors or even permanent difficulty with basic actions such as walking, bending, and talking.
    Although not very common, addiction to inhalants can occur with repeated abuse.

    Lethal Effects

    Sniffing highly concentrated amounts of the chemicals in solvents or aerosol sprays can directly induce heart failure and death within minutes of a session of repeated inhalation. This syndrome, known as “sudden sniffing death,” can result from a single session of inhalant use by an otherwise healthy young person. Sudden sniffing death is particularly associated with the abuse of butane, propane, and chemicals in aerosols.
    High concentrations of inhalants may also cause death from suffocation by displacing oxygen in the lungs, causing the user to lose consciousness and stop breathing. Deliberately inhaling from a paper or plastic bag or in a closed area greatly increases the chances of suffocation. Even when using aerosols or volatile products for their legitimate purposes (i.e., painting, cleaning), it is wise to do so in a well-ventilated room or outdoors.

    +above info was gathered from
    drugabuse.gov/Infofacts/Inhalants

    and links from
    inhalants.drugabuse.

    swim cant post links yet so i took the w's off the front and the second link should have a .gov on the end

     
  2. sandoz1943

    sandoz1943 Titanium Member

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    Nitous oxide can be found under dissociatives
     
  3. Curiouscat22

    Curiouscat22 Silver Member

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    I have a feeling that DF members are not that interested in inhalants/volatile substances!? Or am I wrong?
    I would like to add some info on volatile substances as I feel that they are a class of drugs which many adult substance users begin their relationship with drugs as teenagers, I too can not yet add to wiki's.


    Volatile Solvents
    Introduction
    Several volatile chemicals (including gases such as nitric oxide, volatile
    solvents such as toluene, and aliphatic nitrites) produce effects on the central
    nervous system and are used mainly by children and adolescents due to their
    ready availability. The term inhalant applies to a diverse group
    of substances that can be found in products such as gasoline, nail-polish
    remover, paint stripper and adhesive glue (Weir, 2001). These compounds
    are intentionally sniffed either directly or from a solvent-soaked rag placed
    in the person’s mouth or in a plastic bag. The volatile solvent compounds
    have few characteristics in common other than their toxicity and the
    behavioural effects they produce.

    Behavioural effects
    The intoxication induced by inhalation of solvent vapour produces some
    behavioural effects similar to those due to alcohol. Minutes after inhalation
    dizziness, disorientation and a short period of excitation with euphoria are
    observed, followed by a feeling of light-headedness and a longer period of
    depression of consciousness. In addition, marked changes in mental state
    are induced in people who misuse toluene and other solvents. Most users
    report elevation of mood and hallucinations. Potentially dangerous delusions
    such as believing one can fly or swim also occur, thoughts are likely to be
    slowed, time appears to pass more quickly, and tactile hallucinations are
    common (Evans & Raistrick, 1987). These behavioural effects are
    accompanied by visual disturbances, nystagmus, incoordination and

    unsteady gait, slurred speech, abdominal pain and flushing of the skin.
    Use of volatile solvents
    The term volatile solvent use describes the intentional inhalation of a variety of
    volatile substances (mostly organic solvents), for psychoactive effects. The term
    inhalants has come to encompass a group of psychoactive chemicals that are
    defined by the route of administration rather than by their effects on the central
    nervous system. Thus, such diverse substances as toluene, ether, and nitrites
    have been classified as inhalants because they are all taken in through the nose
    and mouth by inhalation.
    Volatile solvent use (including glue sniffing, inhalant and solvent use) has now
    been reported in various parts of the world, mainly among adolescents, individuals
    living in remote communities and those whose occupations provide easy access
    to these substances. In certain countries volatile solvent use is associated with
    particular groups of young people such as street children and children from
    indigenous populations. Many products that can be used to achieve intoxication
    are readily available in the home and in a range of shops.

    Sources: WHO, 1999; Brouette & Anton, 2001.

    Animal studies have shown that, in common with classical depressant
    drugs, volatile solvents have biphasic effects on motor activity, disrupt
    psychomotor performance, have anticonvulsant effects, produce biphasic
    drug-like effects on rates of schedule-controlled operant behaviour, increase
    rates of punished responding, serve as reinforcers in self-administration
    studies and share discriminative stimulus effects with barbiturates and
    ethanol (Evans & Balster, 1991). Toluene is self-administered in primates
    (Weiss, Wood & Macys, 1979), and has biphasic effects on intracranial selfstimulation,
    increasing the frequency of self-stimulation at lower
    concentrations and decreasing it at higher concentrations. Several solvents
    contained in glue vapours, including toluene, induce conditioned place
    preference and activate the brain reward system in intracranial selfstimulation
    in rats, predicting the dependence-producing potential of volatile
    solvents (Yavich & Patkina, 1994; Yavich & Zvartau, 1994).

    Mechanism of action
    Little is known about the mechanism of action of the solvents, and they have
    received far less attention in research than other psychoactive substances. Most
    reviews consider the nature of the acute effects of volatile organic solvents by
    comparing their actions to those of classical depressant drugs such as the

    barbiturates, benzodiazepines and ethano
    . Based on their physical effects it
    is assumed that solvents induce similar biochemical changes as ethanol and
    anaesthetics, and therefore the search for a GABAergic mechanism of action
    has been pursued. In mice, the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol may

    be substituted for several volatile anaesthetics, toluene and other volatile
    solvents (Bowen & Balster, 1997). Acquisition of toluene discrimination by rats
    and mice, generalizes for GABAergic agents such as barbiturates and
    benzodiazepines, suggesting that toluene may have drug dependence potential
    of the CNS-depressant type (Knisely, Rees & Balster, 1990).
    The commonly used solvents, including toluene, also affect ligand-gated
    ion channel activity. Toluene, similar to ethanol, reversibly enhances GABA(A)
    receptor-mediated synaptic currents. Therefore, the molecular sites of action
    of these compounds may overlap with those of ethanol and the volatile
    anaesthetics (Beckstead et al., 2000). Toluene has excitatory and inhibitory
    biphasic effects on neurotransmission that are related to GABAergic neurotransmission.
    Dopamine in the nucleus accumbens is closely related to substance
    dependence for all psychoactive substances. Acute inhalation of
    toluene by rats results in an increase in extracellular dopamine levels in the
    striatum (Stengard, Hoglund & Ungerstedt, 1994), and changes in neuronal
    firing of dopamine neurons of the VTA (Riegel & French, 1999). Therefore,
    this electrophysiological study suggests that mesolimbic dopamine
    neurotransmission can be changed by toluene exposure, pointing towards

    the same conclusion as the neurochemical studies.
    Other evidence of dopamine involvement following toluene inhalation
    from studies on occupational toxicology. Subchronic inhalation
    exposure to concentrations of toluene likely to be found in occupational

    settings induces persistent changes in locomotor activity and the number of
    dopamine D
    2 receptors in rat caudate (von Euler et al., 1993; Hillefors-

    Berglund, Liu & von Euler, 1995). Toluene-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    may be blocked by D
    2 receptor antagonists (Riegel & French, 1999).

    Tolerance and withdrawal

    The acute neurobehavioural effects of volatile solvents, including anxiolysis

    and sedation, are those typically associated with central nervous system


    depressants, and these effects may lead to continued use, tolerance and
    withdrawal (Beckstead et al., 2000).
    Tolerance may occur but it is considered difficult to estimate in humans.
    It seems to be established after 1–2 months of repetitive exposure to volatile
    solvents (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Rats exposed to high
    environmental concentrations of toluene vapours for long periods of time,
    present tolerance to motor abnormalities (Himnan, 1984).
    Withdrawal from volatile solvents in mice is characterized by increased
    susceptibility to convulsions and may be reversed or diminished by other
    solvent vapours, as well as by ethanol, midazolam and pentobarbital. These
    data support the hypothesis that the basis for volatile solvent use may be its
    ability to produce ethanol-like and depressant drug-like effects (Evans
    & Balster, 1991).



    Neurobiological adaptations to prolonged use


    Persistent changes in dopamine receptor binding and function have been

    found in rats exposed to low concentrations of toluene. In addition, acute


    inhalation exposure to toluene is accompanied by an increase in extracellular
    dopamine levels within the striatum (Stengard, Hoglund & Ungerstedt, 1994),
    while prolonged exposure does not significantly change extracellular
    dopamine levels in rat accumbens (Beyer et al., 2001).
    Repeated exposure to toluene increased the acute motor-stimulant
    response to cocaine and potentiated and prolonged cocaine-induced
    increases in dopamine outflow in the nucleus accumbens, showing that
    repeated exposure to toluene enhances behavioural and neurochemical
    responses to subsequent cocaine administration in rats. This is evidence of
    the development of sensitization and cross-sensitization, which are key
    features in the development of dependence. These findings
    suggest that exposure to toluene alters neuronal function in an area known
    to be critically involved in substance dependence, by increasing sensitivity
    to other psychoactive substances and may, therefore, increase the probability



    of substance dependence (Beyer et al., 2001).


    [COLOR=#292526]Organic solvent inhalation is the cause of several neuropathological[/COLOR]

    changes that are associated with decreased cognitive functioning. Workers

    chronically exposed to mixtures of organic solvents in the environment at


    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]concentrations within or slightly exceeding the acceptable values, present[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [LEFT][FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]with subtle cognitive deficits, detected through visual evoked potentials[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526](Indulski et al., 1996). Chronic inhalation of primarily toluene-based solvents[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]can produce a persistent paranoid psychosis, temporal lobe epilepsy and a[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]decrease in IQ. These psychiatric and neurological sequelae of chronic solvent[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]use are serious and potentially irreversible (Byrne et al., 1991). The degree to[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]which these chronic neuropsychiatric effects modulate the persistent use of[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][COLOR=#292526]solvents or other substances needs clarification.[/COLOR][/FONT][/LEFT]
















    Curiouscat22 added 14 Minutes and 19 Seconds later...

    argh why do those gaps keep coming back after i have edited the font!!!!????? how frustrating:mad:
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2010
  4. masmith31593

    masmith31593

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    swim is aware of this but the information provided was more about volatile substances such as solvents or aerosols.
     
  5. coolhandluke

    coolhandluke Titanium Member

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    swim had a good month long inhalants binge. the best are ether and gasoline. these are so bad for your body its hard to even comprehend. swim has had seizures and spent a lot of time unconscious while using inhalants (swim was so fucked up he couldn't really tell, but his friends let him know) out of all the drugs in the world you can try inhalants are the worst in his opinion. the second time swim went to rehab he met a guy who huffed too much and his brain was strait mush, i could hardly understand his speech. swin is very fortunate that he did not have the same fate. After seeing that guy swim will never go near inhalants ever again.
     
  6. D3VVO

    D3VVO Newbie

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    Swim also used to dabble into the inhalants when he was about 15-16 bored with no weed. His favorite thing to do was go buy Glade brand air freshener canisters, put a towel over it, lie down and just go to outer space. Swim loved to hear the noise that he heard inside his head when he was messed up on this stuff and oh my the colors. Swim stopped using inhalants after his friend had a seizure and the reality of what he was doing to himself kind of set in. Swim hasn't touched the stuff since
     
  7. PlaneCrash

    PlaneCrash

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    Irvine Welsh and Kurt Cobain have confessed to heavy inhalant abuse yet are absolved by their undeniable intellect. I'm sure you guys have not spared too much to keep rolling :thumbsup:
     
  8. 0utrider

    0utrider Palladium Member

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    Inhalants Basics

    Inhalants Basics


    Frequently Asked Questions About Inhalants They're all over your house. They're in your child's school. In fact, you probably picked some up the last time you went to the grocery store. Educate yourself. Find out about inhalants before your children do.
    Most parents are in the dark regarding the popularity and dangers of inhalant use. But children are quickly discovering that common household products are inexpensive to obtain, easy to hide and the easiest way to get high.
    According to national surveys, inhaling dangerous products is becoming one of the most widespread problems in the country. It is as popular as marijuana with young people.

    More than a million people used inhalants to get high just last year. By the time a student reaches the 8th grade, one in five will have used inhalants.
    What is inhalant use? Inhalant use refers to the intentional breathing of gas or vapors with the purpose of reaching a high. Inhalants are legal, everyday products which have a useful purpose, but can be misused.
    You're probably familiar with many of these substances (paint, glue and others). But you probably don't know that there are more than 1,000 products that are very dangerous when inhaled, things like typewriter correction fluid, air-conditioning refrigerant, felt tip markers, spray paint, air freshener, butane and even cooking spray.

    Who is at risk? Inhalants are an equal opportunity method of substance abuse. Statistics show that young, white males have the highest usage rates. Hispanic and American Indian populations also show high rates of usage.
    What can inhalants do to the body? Nearly all abused products produce effects similar to anesthetics, which slow down the body's function. Varying upon level of dosage, the user can experience slight stimulation, feeling of less inhibition or loss of consciousness. The user can also suffer from Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome.
    This means the user can die the 1st, 10th or 100th time he or she uses an inhalant. Other effects include damage to the heart, kidney, brain, liver, bone marrow and other organs.
    Results similar to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome may also occur when inhalants are used during pregnancy. Inhalants are physically and psychologically addicting and users suffer withdrawal symptoms.

    What can I do if someone I know is huffing and appears in a state of crisis? If someone you know is huffing, the best thing to do is remain calm and seek help. Agitation may cause the huffer to become violent, experience hallucinations or suffer heart dysfunction which can cause Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome.
    Make sure the room is well ventilated and call EMS. If the person is not breathing, administer CPR. Once recovered, seek professional treatment and counseling.
    Can inhalant use be treated? Treatment facilities for inhalant users are rare and difficult to find. Users suffer a high rate of relapse, and require thirty to forty days or more of detoxification.

    Users suffer withdrawal symptoms which can include hallucinations, nausea, excessive sweating, hand tremors, muscle cramps, headaches, chills and delirium tremens. Follow-up treatment is very important.
    If you or someone you know is seeking help for inhalant abuse, you can contact the National Inhalant Prevention Coalition at 1-800-269-4237 for information on treatment centers and general information on inhalants. Through a network of nationwide contacts, NIPC can help (but not guarantee) finding a center in your area that treats inhalant use.
    What should I tell my child or students about inhalants? It is never too early to teach your children about the dangers of inhalants. Don't just say "not my kid."

    Inhalant use starts as early as elementary school and is considered a gateway to further substance abuse. Parents often remain ignorant of inhalant use or do not educate their children until it is too late. Inhalants are not drugs.
    They are poisons and toxins and should be discussed as such. There are, however, a few age appropriate guidelines that can be useful when educating your children.
    How can I educate my community about inhalants? NIPC leads the annual National Inhalants And Poisons Awareness Week (NIPAW) every third week in March. The next campaign will be held March 15-21, 1998.
    This community mobilization campaign has proven to be an effective tool for fighting inhalant abuse. In Texas, where the campaign originated, inhalant use decreased following widespread involvement in NIPAW.

    • What are Inhalants?
      Inhalants are a diverse group of volatile substances whose chemical vapors can be inhaled to produce psychoactive (mind-altering) effects. While other abused substances can be inhaled, the term “inhalants” is used to describe substances that are rarely, if ever, taken by any other route of administration. A variety of products common in the home and workplace contain substances that can be inhaled to get high; however, people do not typically think of these products (e.g., spray paints, glues, and cleaning fluids) as drugs because they were never intended to induce intoxicating effects. Yet young children and adolescents can easily obtain these extremely toxic substances, and are among those most likely to abuse them. In fact, more 8th graders have tried inhalants than any other illicit drug.
    • What Types of Products are Abused as Inhalants?
      Inhalants fall into the following categories:

      Volatile solvents—liquids that vaporize at room temperature

      * Industrial or household products, including paint thinners or removers, degreasers, dry-cleaning fluids, gasoline, lighter fluid
      * Art or office supply solvents, including correction fluids, felt-tip marker fluid, electronic contact cleaners, glue

      Aerosols—sprays that contain propellants and solvents

      * Household aerosol propellants in items such as spray paints, hair or deodorant sprays, fabric protector sprays, aerosol computer cleaning products, and vegetable oil sprays

      Gases—found in household or commercial products and used as medical anesthetics

      * Household or commercial products, including butane lighters and propane tanks, whipped cream aerosols or dispensers (whippets), and refrigerant gases
      * Medical anesthetics, such as ether, chloroform, halothane, and nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”)

      Nitrites—a special class of inhalants that are used primarily as sexual enhancers

      * Organic nitrites are volatiles that include cyclohexyl, butyl, and amyl nitrites, commonly known as “poppers.” Amyl nitrite is still used in certain diagnostic medical procedures. When marketed for illicit use, they are often sold in small brown bottles labeled as “video head cleaner,” “room odorizer,” “leather cleaner,” or “liquid aroma.”

      These various products contain a wide range of chemicals such as:

      * toluene (spray paints, rubber cement, gasoline),
      * chlorinated hydrocarbons (dry cleaning chemicals, correction fluids),
      * hexane (glues, gasoline),
      * benzene (gasoline),
      * methylene chloride (varnish removers, paint thinners),
      * butane (cigarette lighter refills, air fresheners), and
      * nitrous oxide (whipped cream dispensers, gas cylinders).

      Adolescents tend to abuse different products at different ages. Among new users aged 12–15, the most commonly abused inhalants were glue, shoe polish, spray paints, gasoline, and lighter fluid. Among new users aged 16 or 17, the most commonly abused products were nitrous oxide or whippets. Nitrites are the class of inhalants most commonly abused by adults.
    • How are Inhalants Abused?
      Inhalants can be breathed in through the nose or mouth in a variety of ways, such as sniffing or snorting fumes from a container, spraying aerosols directly into the nose or mouth, or placing an inhalant-soaked rag in the mouth (“huffing”). Users may also inhale fumes from a balloon or a plastic or paper bag that contains an inhalant.

      The intoxication produced by inhalants usually lasts just a few minutes; therefore, users often try to extend the “high” by continuing to inhale repeatedly over several hours.
    • How Do Inhalants Affect the Brain?
      The effects of inhalants are similar to those of alcohol, including slurred speech, lack of coordination, euphoria, and dizziness. Inhalant abusers may also experience lightheadedness, hallucinations, and delusions. With repeated inhalations, many users feel less inhibited and less in control. Some may feel drowsy for several hours and experience a lingering headache. Chemicals found in different types of inhaled products may produce a variety of additional effects, such as confusion, nausea, or vomiting.

      By displacing air in the lungs, inhalants deprive the body of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia. Hypoxia can damage cells throughout the body, but the cells of the brain are especially sensitive to it. The symptoms of brain hypoxia vary according to which regions of the brain are affected: the hippocampus, for example, helps control memory, so someone who repeatedly uses inhalants may lose the ability to learn new things or may have a hard time carrying on simple conversations.

      Long-term inhalant abuse can also break down myelin, a fatty tissue that surrounds and protects some nerve fibers. Myelin helps nerve fibers carry their messages quickly and efficiently, and when damaged can lead to muscle spasms and tremors or even permanent difficulty with basic actions like walking, bending, and talking.

      Although not very common, addiction to inhalants can occur with repeated abuse. According to the 2006 Treatment Episode Dataset, inhalants were reported as the primary substance abused by less than 0.1 percent of all individuals admitted to substance abuse treatment. However, of those individuals who reported inhalants as their primary, secondary, or tertiary drug of abuse, nearly half were adolescents aged 12 to 17. This age group represents only 8 percent of total admissions to treatment.
    • What Other Adverse Effects Do Inhalants Have on Health?
      Lethal effects:
      Sniffing highly concentrated amounts of the chemicals in solvents or aerosol sprays can directly induce heart failure and death within minutes of a session of repeated inhalations. This syndrome, known as “sudden sniffing death,” can result from a single session of inhalant use by an otherwise healthy young person. Sudden sniffing death is particularly associated with the abuse of butane, propane, and chemicals in aerosols.

      High concentrations of inhalants may also cause death from suffocation by displacing oxygen in the lungs, causing the user to lose consciousness and stop breathing. Deliberately inhaling from a paper or plastic bag or in a closed area greatly increases the chances of suffocation. Even when using aerosols or volatile products for their legitimate purposes (i.e., painting, cleaning), it is wise to do so in a well-ventilated room or outdoors.

      Harmful irreversible effects:

      * Hearing loss—spray paints, glues, dewaxers, dry-cleaning chemicals, correction fluids
      * Peripheral neuropathies or limb spasms—glues, gasoline, whipped cream dispensers, gas cylinders
      * Central nervous system or brain damage—spray paints, glues, dewaxers
      * Bone marrow damage—gasoline

      Serious but potentially reversible effects:

      * Liver and kidney damage—correction fluids, dry-cleaning fluids
      * Blood oxygen depletion—varnish removers, paint thinners

      HIV/AIDS:
      Because nitrites are abused to enhance sexual pleasure and performance, they can be associated with unsafe sexual practices that greatly increase the risk of contracting and spreading infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis.


    • How Widespread is Inhalant Abuse?
      Monitoring the Future
      According to the Monitoring the Future survey, more 8th graders (15.6 percent) have tried inhalants in their lifetime than any other illicit drug, including marijuana. Lifetime use (use at least once during a respondent’s lifetime) of inhalants was reported by 15.6 percent of 8th graders, 13.6 percent of 10th graders, and 10.5 percent of 12th graders in 2007; 3.9 percent of 8th graders, 2.5 percent of 10th graders, and 1.2 percent of 12th graders were current users of inhalants (had used at least once during the 30 days preceding response to the survey).

      National Survey on Drug Use and Health**
      Data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that the primary abusers of most inhalants are adolescents ages 12 to 17. In 2006, 4.4 percent of adolescents reported using inhalants in the past year. Among young adults aged 18 to 25, past-year use of inhalants decreased from 2.1 percent in 2005 to 1.8 percent in 2006. Of the 783,000 persons aged 12 or older who tried inhalants for the first time within the previous year, 77.2 percent were under age 18 when they first used. found on a1b2c3.com/drugs/
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
  9. Stimulants

    Stimulants Gold Member

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    Whoever wrote that isn't particularly good with chemistry. The categories are all wrong. In my opinion, the only thing deserving a unique category is the nitrite as they don't have the same mechanism of action.

    Gases/volatile solvents shouldn't be in a separate category since the only character these categories describe is the difference in boiling point and vapor pressure.

    There are MAC% values available for many of gases and usually the lower percentage ones have more potent effect. Nitrous oxide's solubility in lipid layer is low compared to organic vapors and it is not very potent.

    Some thing to keep in mind. Aside from the obvious that displacing air can cause asphyxiation, some organic vapors are quite toxic. Looking at OSHA PEL in ppm gives a pretty good idea. Lower the PEL(permissible exposure level), the higher the toxicity.

    Although, the use is not encouraged, there are some solvents/gases that should be avoided such as, but if one's going to do it anyways, here are some list of toxic/moderate/not so toxic for the purpose of HARM REDUCTION


    Definitely toxic:
    Carbon disulfide

    Carbon tetrachloride (extremely toxic to those with alcohol in system. Even a accidental whiff of this stuff has claimed some lives when it was used in common household products)

    acetonitrile

    moderate:
    most chlorinated solvents (chloroform, methylene chloride, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene etc), benzene, toluene, hexane

    low:
    propane, butane, heptane, pentane, ether and most CFCs,HCFCs and HFCs

    Dust off (difluoroethane) is one of the less toxic inhalants, as it is meant to be used indoors without special considerations while solvents are meant to be used with good ventilation.

    Ether is more dangerous in a way that its vapor is flammable in a wide range and auto-ignition temperature is low, so it's prone to catching on fire.
     
  10. godztear

    godztear Silver Member

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    Difluoroethane or Computer Duster - I am very surprised that there is no wiki article specifically about this considering the wide spread abuse and risks involved including death. In most stores you have to be at least 18 to purchase it even.
     
  11. sykes

    sykes

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    SWIM has dabbled with inhalants but never got any noticeable Euphoria or disorientation. Maybe he wasn't inhaling enough, but then again he didn't want to suffocate himself and cause permanent brain damage.
     
  12. phenythylamine

    phenythylamine

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    wow this seems to be the most poorly understood subject on this site.

    first off inhalants are not a class of drugs, inhalants are any drug which the vapor is inhaled for psychoactive effects, they each fall into different classes with different effects, and different dangers/toxicity.

    not all inhalants are more dangerous than other drugs. Ether, nitrous oxide, nitrites, xenon, chloroform, and other medical anaesthetic inhalants are examples of these.

    Personally I think the dangers of certain inhalants are vastly overstated, it seems some people still equate huffing ether to huffing toluene or gasoline, its not the same thing, ether has been used in medicine for a very long time and is quite safe (the starter fluid stuff contains CFCs which are presumed to be rather dangerous, with no evidence to the contrary, so it is to be avoided.)

    the reality here guys, its the same type of scare tactics used for any other kind of drug the only difference is that even people on DF seem to believe this one.

    really I would compare the dangers of huffing to the dangers of experimenting with RCs, the danger is unknown, and that is the biggest danger.

    I personally dont huff, neither does afoaf, he has tried it and found it really dirty, and not all that euphoric.

    however there is one really interesting inhalant that is almost psychedelic, exeptionally safe, and hardly ever talked about, carbogen (a mixture of 5-30% carbon dioxide and 70% or more oxygen, this allows for one to experience the mind altering effects of carbon dioxide without worrying about suffocation because sufficient oxygen is being administered with the CO2. afoaf experienced an initial sensation of panic followed by beautiful geometric patterns with his eyes closed.

    anyways just a bunch or random info on a taboo subject here on DF.
     
  13. theastrodude

    theastrodude Newbie

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    SWIM has a vast experience with Toluene, swim huffed it for about 2-3 years, sometimes months at a time, daily. Swim has learned to control the hallucinations induced by Toluene very well, ending up creating whole new universes in the middle of a field and in his garage where he'd sit and huff away his years, sometimes completely dozing off and waking up at 5 o'clock in the middle of the field in winter, swims usage of toluene increased to a point where he could not get his daily needed toluene amount (in his country sold in little bottles of 20, 50 and 100ml) of about 15 20ml bottles.

    SWIM has quitted Toluene 9 months ago and since then has never touched it, though getting extreme cravings for about 2 months after quitting.

    swim quitted toluene because he started to encounter more and more of the side effects and his family found out about his abuse and have been supportive by setting up appointments at a local psychological cabinet.

    swim sometimes still craves toluene, mainly because he misses his "universe" but he realizes that he doesn't want to start again.

    In all the time swim used toluene he destroyed hundreds of clothes (he used mainly plastic bags and A4 plastic paper bags which sometimes failed and leaked over his t-shirt/shirt/pants/shoes), got into problems with the police and with friends, lost a lot of friends because of the way toluene shaped him and lost his girlfriend, not to mention swim has been diagnosed with minor neurological problems and overall organs wear.

    Swim does not come from a poor family, by the contrary, swim had a good family background, but the passion he developed for toluene didn't stop him when he was dubbed "a bum" or "junkie" and a lot of jokes were made about him and his use of toluene.

    swim does not encourage anyone to use toluene as it can become quite addictive (psychological) in time.
     
  14. AlexSleyore

    AlexSleyore Newbie

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    Etikno Started using inhalants at the age of 16, Etikno is now 19. Etikno has tried gas, dusters , ether, and nitrous oxide.

    In Etikno's experiences gas was the most common, ranging from mild buzzes for full out of body experiences. Etikno huffed gas almost every night for 3 months during a summer, however it caused an inability to fall asleep, tasted gross, and would occasionally give bad trips.

    Duster being the next cheapest and easiest to get is 2nd with many of the same effects as gas, only strong and shorter lasting - also doesnt smell as bad. It does not have the same inability to fall asleep after the buzz wears off, however now dosed with bitterant - still tastes better then gas.

    Ether Etikno tried twice, both times saying its much stronger then gas, and causes more of a body high then a head high, Etikno might of tried it more but Etikno's friend spilled some on his pants, and then tried sitting by a wall for a few hours -.-, Etikno's friend almost died and someone took it upon themselves to chuck the VHS clearer into the woods.

    Nitrous oxide being tried both from whip cream and from whippets is a very nice body high, however very short lasting once its exhaled. Harder to get for people strapped for cash but worth looking into.

    Etikno finds that on a scale of how much he enjoyed them
    Duster -9
    NO2 - 8
    ether - 4
    gas - 1