Is caffiene a dopamine antagonist?

Discussion in 'Pharmacology' started by sands of time, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. sands of time

    sands of time Gold Member

    Reputation Points:
    361
    Messages:
    1,267
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Is caffiene a dopamine antagonist like other stimulents?
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Reputation Points:
    0
    i think but slightly... like only in certain people... it effects me... but it wont bring me out of a bad mood... but it will help me if i am already... so i think its only slightly... i dont know a whole lot tho so...anyone else?
     
  3. ShadyMilkman

    ShadyMilkman Mercury Member

    Reputation Points:
    47
    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2004
    No, its an agonist.
     
  4. beachball1

    beachball1 Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    0
    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2004
    Not an agonist at all, tho it releases small amounts of dopamine and noradreline by antagonizing adenosine (the hormone that stopts dopamine/adrenaline release and makes you sleepy).
     
  5. Micklemouse

    Micklemouse Platinum Member & Advisor

    Reputation Points:
    4,627
    Messages:
    3,044
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    from U.K.
    In that case wouldn't it be a partial-agonist? Anyhoo, here's a load of stuff about caffeine from those lovely people at Wikipedia!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 26, 2010
  6. Nitrate

    Nitrate Gold Member

    Reputation Points:
    37
    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    from Canada
    RG said it right - it does not directly produce dopamine. This
    can be "proven?" with a simple experiment. Go take as many
    wakeups as you dare say 5? (500mg of caffine) with nothing else.
    You will be perky, nausous, and paranoid but not high. Caffine is
    essentialy non-euphoric. It can be a pickup but not much
    more.



    It works by blocking the effects of adenosine which is produced by
    cells exhausting there ATP supply (a fairly universal energy token used
    by almost all living cells). ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is
    converted to ADP (di-phos.) then AMP (mono-phos.) then finaly
    adenosine. Typicaly high adenosine levels are a sign of
    exaustion, poor blood flow, lack of O2, etc. all signs you should slow
    down and get some rest. Since this system influences other
    systems but does
    not
    controll any vital life function itself, caffine is a relitivly safe
    drug with
    fairly forgiving overdoeses and withdrawls (as compared to drugs that
    directly perturb
    the dopamine system). Your body also adapts to it quickly as
    well, 3 days being all that is required to be rid of physical withdrawl
    symtomes (or develop a 10 cup of joe a day habit)


    Edited by: Nitrate
     
  7. McDiggy

    McDiggy Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    45
    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    From Gold Standard Media's Clinical Pharmacolgy: