Drug info - Legality of taking Diazepam to UK

Discussion in 'Benzodiazepines' started by Dj mOonShiNe, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. Dj mOonShiNe

    Dj mOonShiNe Newbie

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    I am planing a trip to London for work and was wondering if anyone knew the legality of taking his part time lover Valarie (Diaz) wit him.. he has a scipt due to anxiety/(treatment for drinking problem{well he own's his own still}
    should he bother talking to his doc. and if he previously has had them proscribed, whats the likelyhood of him finding a doc in London who'll write for him. (I am most deffo not asking for a referal, just a genrel feeling type thing)
    even though I don't take them 4 fun no more, its great to smooch Val th morning after a hard nite..
     
  2. Micklemouse

    Micklemouse Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Re: Legality of takeing Valarie to UK

    Speak to SWiYer doc & ask him/her to write a covering letter with contact details & details of what & how much is prescribed, & what for, make sure the medication is in the container/box & blister pack it came in which I imagine if it came from a pharmacy will have SWiYour name at least on it, & there should be few if any problems at Customs.

    As for the likelihood of finding a doc to write for him in London, I'd say slim - to get a doctor in Briton one first has to register & see a practise nurse for a physical, which alone can take a couple of weeks to come through, before actually seeing a G.P.. There are out-of-hours doctors who may be able to write a script in an emergency at the weekend (again documentation & packaging would aid this) but with British doctors generally being wary of benzo's I wouldn't count on it. Better to maybe get your mongoose to ask his/her doc to prescribe enough to see them through the trip if possible.
     
  3. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Re: Legality of takeing Valarie to UK

    From the rules:

    • Use descriptive Topic Subject. This will help others find what they want to read. Topics with bad Topic subjects may be deleted! - there's nothing more annoying than looking at all those stupid "A stupid question" subject lines. I mean, I'm damn lazy, but how hard is it to type "A stupid question about (insert something here)"? As a rule of thumb, most thread titles should include the full name of the drug discussed.

    A rule many tend to forget will cause a mass of warnings soon...

    Edited to include "Diazepam" in title. Also moved to the "Benzodiazepines" sub-forum
     
  4. Psych0naut

    Psych0naut Platinum Member

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    Micklemouse, I have been to both private clinics, and to NHS hospitals, and he didn't have to make a appointment, or even wait at the private clinics.
    Ofcourse private clinics are pretty expensive, but you don't have to wait long, if you have to even wait at all for an appointment.
    I don't live in the U.K. and only had a couple of experiences with the docs over there, so it might have only been rare occasions.
     
  5. Micklemouse

    Micklemouse Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Psych0naut - I am of course talking about the NHS, but do tell us more about the walk-in private clinics, I'm intrigued. Did SWiP use them for similar reasons to the one being asked about in this thread? Most that I am aware of will be referral, unless of course the patient is willing & able to pay through the nose & jump the queue, although medical & travel insurance may cover this.

    Of course Accident & Emergency is open to all. However I don't think a non-tax payer running out of his script when he could have got it filled before travelling is a valid use of A&E, or will be seen as such by the staff - if the person trying to get a script gets past triage a lengthy wait in a shit environment will almost certainly ensue, only to be told there is little if anything that can be done, a referral may be made to a local GP for an assessment or emergency script, or not, depending on the doctor seen, unless of course serious life-threatening, fit inducing withdrawals are taking place, which given the half-life of valium is unlikely. What is more likely is the person will be told to go away, and to make an appointment with the out-of-hours GP - more waiting with the same slim chance of a positive result.

    As stated, British medics are wary of benzo's & the prescription of them without documentation, medical records or proof otherwise of need, & it is hard enough for British tax-payers to get this help, let alone tourists, albeit working ones (no offense meant Dj M!). Part of the reason for this is the aforementioned private clinics, which have provided the perfect excuse to underfund the NHS under the guise of free-market & choice, but that rant has no place here...

    If the patient has a regular, legitimate script there is no reason for them not to get it filled before travelling, making all this rather moot & unnecessary.
     
  6. Dj mOonShiNe

    Dj mOonShiNe Newbie

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    my appologies bout the thred title... thanks to all for the responces. looks like my mongoose needs to book an apointment to c th doc for a repeat..
     
  7. Psych0naut

    Psych0naut Platinum Member

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    The reason I went to both the private clinics and the NHS hospitals was because he had a infection on his right foot, which was getting very bad.
    At the private clinics SWIM just walked in, was inmediately reffered to the G.P's office by the receptionist, not because his infection needed urgent treatment, because it wasn't too bad at the time yet, but he was reffered inmediately because there wasn't a waiting line, nowhere in the whole clinic were there people waiting, and the clinic was reasonable large.
    What amazed I was that after the examination, he had to pay the bill in cash or with his credit card, instead of getting a bill sent home.
    At the hospital I had to wait for 15 minutes or so after visiting, 15 minutes later he was examined and admitted to the ward straight away.
    I didn't make an appointment, but just walked in, so that has been a difference as well, it may take a lot longer if you just call for an appointment.
     
  8. Micklemouse

    Micklemouse Platinum Member & Advisor

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    And there lies the rub... SWiP attended for what would be seen as a valid medical emergency, immediately treatable, & probably triaged as a high priority. Other factors such as geographical location, time of day, luck of the draw will come into play in judging waiting times - big city A&E's are hell holes with long waiting times (generally). Running out of a script is not a medical emergency, it is a lack of foresight. A private clinic may not give two hoots, as all they are interested in is making a bit of money, & will not be under as much pressure as an NHS unit. They are however not that common, & they will still have to abide by prescribing guidelines & law though.

    Accident & Emergency departments are for just that - Accidents & Emergencies. Anyone showing up who has not had an accident, or is not suffering with a medical emergency will get short shrift from the staff. Running out of a script is not a medical emergency, & will be treat as a low priority if at all.

    If someone is going to be in the country for a while it may be worth registering with a GP, again with documentation, covering letter & packaging.

    For Australian Citizens

    From smarttraveller.gov.au

    http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/tips/working_os.html





    For US citizens

    From University Of Michigan Medical School

    http://www.med.umich.edu/medschool/global/travel.htm#Health