mixing TFMPP and cMPP

Discussion in 'Research Chemicals' started by DJ-666, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. DJ-666

    DJ-666 Mercury Member

    Reputation Points:
    8
    Messages:
    126
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    from Germany
    Any experiences in mixing this two chemicals together - regarding to its effects on your body/mind?

    Dangers?
     
  2. Thirdedge

    Thirdedge Gold Member

    Reputation Points:
    1,067
    Messages:
    940
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    from earth
    Piper mix

    I have consumed these two in combination with BZP and meopp. Very nice 'e' like experience in low dose, higher dose makes one feel sunburnt inside out.
     
  3. DJ-666

    DJ-666 Mercury Member

    Reputation Points:
    8
    Messages:
    126
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    from Germany
    thank you very much...swim think he will try it with some friends in the near future after your answer...
     
  4. Thirdedge

    Thirdedge Gold Member

    Reputation Points:
    1,067
    Messages:
    940
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    from earth
    Just be sure to dose on the conservative side. Both cpp and mpp seem to make people far more sick than bzp or tfmpp.
     
  5. xiananena

    xiananena Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    19
    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    A study with RATS seemed to demonstrate that BZP+TFMPP have a stronger effect when are taken together. I found no studies with humans...


    N-substituted piperazines abused by humans mimic the molecular mechanism of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or 'Ecstasy').

    Baumann MH, Clark RD, Budzynski AG, Partilla JS, Blough BE, Rothman RB.

    Clinical Psychopharmacology Section, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. [email protected]

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or 'Ecstasy') is an illicit drug that stimulates the release of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) from neurons. Recent evidence reveals that drug users are ingesting piperazine analogs, like 1-benzylpiperazine (BZP, or 'A2') and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (TFMPP, or 'Molly'), to mimic psychoactive effects of MDMA. In the present study, we compared the neurochemistry of MDMA, BZP, and TFMPP in rats. The effects of MDMA, BZP, and TFMPP on transporter-mediated efflux of [3H]5-HT and [3H]MPP+ (DA transporter substrate) were determined in synaptosomes. The effects of drugs on extracellular levels of 5-HT and DA were examined using in vivo microdialysis in conscious rats. MDMA evoked transporter-mediated release of [3H]5-HT and [3H]MPP+. BZP released [3H]MPP+, whereas TFMPP was a selective releaser of [3H]5-HT. MDMA (1-3 mg/kg, i.v.) increased dialysate 5-HT and DA in a dose-related fashion, with actions on 5-HT being predominant. BZP (3-10 mg/kg, i.v.) elevated dialysate DA and 5-HT, while TFMPP (3-10 mg/kg, i.v.) elevated 5-HT. Administration of BZP plus TFMPP at a 1:1 ratio (BZP/TFMPP) produced parallel increases in dialysate 5-HT and DA; a 3 mg/kg dose of BZP/TFMPP mirrored the effects of MDMA. At a 10 mg/kg dose, BZP/TFMPP increased dialysate DA more than the summed effects of each drug alone, and some rats developed seizures. Our results show that BZP/TFMPP and MDMA share the ability to evoke monoamine release, but dangerous drug-drug synergism may occur when piperazines are coadministered at high doses.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 10, 2017