more chemical info on salvia divinorum please

Discussion in 'Salvia divinorum' started by ecs24soldier, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. ecs24soldier

    ecs24soldier Newbie

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    I have read the basics and am just wondering if any of you can ellaborate on the chemical properties of this substance and how it effects your body and mind. Such as brain chemicals released and where the sensations come from.I havea pretty good understanding how most other substances work and would really like to know more about this one. I have read that it effects the opioid receptors if this is true would there be a possibility that somehow science could use its mechanism to engineer a pain medication?
     
  2. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Gold Member

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    Truth is, no-one knows yet which part of the mind salvia impacts on. Research is limited so far and whatever research attempted has left scientists baffled.
     
  3. ecs24soldier

    ecs24soldier Newbie

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    I wonder why the research is so limted. You would think that atleast the pharm industry would be researching it for possible medical uses or as a precursor to new drugs.
     
  4. MrJim

    MrJim Gold Member

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    Salvinorin A is a potent Kappa opiod receptor agonist. There is a report on the net (subjective) that preadministration of a opiod receptor antagonist (naloxone) nullifies the effects of Salvinorin A. There is some talk about it being a possible source for pain relief. Morphine affects the mu opiod receptors strongly and the Kappa weakly. Kappa is considered the visual receptors. Salvia doesn't really touch the mu receptors, but plays on the kappas. It is possible that it could be engineered to provide some sort of pain relief - Mazatec's used it for cough supressants (codiene has always been popular for that).
     
  5. ecs24soldier

    ecs24soldier Newbie

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    Thanks mr Jim That brings another question that maybe would be more appropriate in the chemistry section but it still applies here too. If the kappa receptors are more responsible for visual stimulation and the mu are more for pain wich is mostly responsible for the high from most opiates? I am assuming that the physical feelings come from the mu.
     
  6. MrJim

    MrJim Gold Member

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    Yes, Indeed.