Mushrooms and Ozone

Discussion in 'Magic Mushroom hunting' started by Alfa, Jul 24, 2004.

  1. Alfa

    Alfa Productive Insomniac Staff Member Administrator

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    Liberty caps,woodloving shrooms likeazurescens, bohemica, etc. come up during fall. Reconstructing temp., co2, moist, doesn't do the trick for me. That leaves me to the question; why do they sprout during fall? Searching and asking about what's so different in the fallI came across the fact that during the fall ozone levels are higher during fall as an effect of lightning. Does anybody have info on if this is a factor in mushroom growing? Do you have any other ideas? Did any of you succeed in growing liberty caps inside? If so how?
     
  2. OneDiaDem

    OneDiaDem Nefelibata Platinum Member

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    It has to do with lower temps. Not ozone.
     
  3. Alfa

    Alfa Productive Insomniac Staff Member Administrator

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    Have you ever seen someone growing liberty caps indoor in summer?
     
  4. OneDiaDem

    OneDiaDem Nefelibata Platinum Member

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    I dont know anyone who has grown liberty caps at all. Let me do some calls, and get back to you.

    Basidiocarps of Psilocybe semilanceata from a single location (DÜBENER HEIDE G.D.R., Sept. 21, 1987) were dried at room temperature. Possibly present residual water was removed from the mushrooms by freeze-drying. Mycelium obtained from the spores of one mushroom (GARTZ & MULLER, 1989) was kept as a stock culture on 6% malt agar. Cotton-plugged 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks were filled with horse manure compost (STAMETS & CHILTON, 1983), sterilized by autoclaving, cooled, innoculated from stock cultures and incubated at 21 °C.
    Fruiting of the mycelia occured without casing 12 till 16 weeks after inoculation. The strain of Gymnopilus purpuratus cultivated in this study originated from a spore print taken in the northern G.D.R. in Sept. 1987.
    Mycelium of this species was grown on 4% malt agar. A 2:1 rice grain saw dust mixture with twice the amount of water was used to obtain fruiting without casing. The first basidiocarps were produced by cultures of Gymnopilus purpuratus in 8 weeks.
    The cultures continued to produce mushrooms in five flushes as Psilocybe semilanceata. The two species required diffuse day light for pinhead initiation. Each flush was harvested as soon as the basidiocarps were mature. The mushrooms were immediately freeze-dried, sealed in plastic, and stored at -10 °C until analysis. Each flush was analysed to determinate the average alkaloid level in the mushrooms.
    Basidiocarps of Conocybe cyanopus (ATK.). KÜHNER were harvested from a location near Potsdam (G.D.R., July 2, 1989). A very slowly growing mycelium on malt agar was obtained from spores.
    No fruiting on rice grain or compost could be observed. The mycelium was also harvested from the agar after 12 weeks cultivation. Then it was freeze-dried, extracted and analysed as the mushrooms.
    The extraction procedure of the mushrooms and the quantitative analysis of psilocybin, baeocystin and psilocin by means of HPLC were described in previous papers (GARTZ, 1985, 1989a, b; SEMERDZIEVA et al., 1986). Results obtained by HPLC were confirmed by TLC using various mobile phases (GARTZ, 1985; SEMERDZIEVA et al., 1986).
     
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