Opinions - Sulphasalazine Can Reverse Liver Disease Even For Heavy Drinkers

Discussion in 'Alcohol' started by HandyMan81, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. HandyMan81

    HandyMan81 Titanium Member

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    Sulphasalazine, a cheap drug currently used for arthritis and IBS (inflammatory bowel disease) can reverse the scarring that comes with cirrhosis of the liver, say scientists from the University of Newcastle, UK. Doctors had always thought that fibrosis - scarring associated with cirrhosis - was irreversible. This new study on animals has shown the damage can be reversed with Sulphasalazine.

    In the UK, about 10% of the adult population have liver problems, mainly due to heavy drinking and obesity/overweight.

    The liver has hepatic myofibrobrlasts, these are cells that create scar tissue when the organ is injured. Hepatic myofibrobrlasts produce proteins which makes it more difficult to break down the scar tissue. In a healthy liver the scars gradually disappear and new healthy ones replace them. This does not happen when the liver tissue is diseased - and the scar tissue spreads.

    The scientists found that Sulphasalazine stops the hepatic myofibrobrlasts from producing the protein that protects the scar tissue cells. In other words, it helps the scar tissue to gradually melt away.

    If human trials show similar results, it could mean treating and-stage patients with Sulphasalazine rather than having them undergo a liver transplant. The scientists say they will start trials with heavy drinkers who no longer drink, but whose livers are not able to recover on their own.

    This drug could be a Godsend for alcoholics who have given up drinking. Even a seemingly small recovery of 10% can make a huge difference to the patient's general health and quality of life, say the researchers.

    The researchers say Sulphasalazine could halve the cirrhosis death rate in the UK. Treatment would cost £10 ($18.50) per week.

    Some Facts About Cirrhosis

    -- Responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year worldwide

    -- Responsible for 5,000 - 10,000 deaths per year in the UK

    -- Early stages are symptom free (so damage accumulates unnoticed)

    -- There is currently no cure. The only end-stage treatment is a liver
    transplant.

    -- Most common causes are Hepatitis C (globally) and excessive alcohol
    consumption (developed countries)

    -- Scotland has particularly high rates among developed countries




    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/healthnews.php?newsid=52735
     
    1. 3/5,
      Good article
      Dec 24, 2006
  2. mickenator

    mickenator Titanium Member

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    Would this help reverse some of the damage swims hepatitus has done to his liver?
     
  3. johnny_socko

    johnny_socko Newbie

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    There is hope for me yet... ;)

    JS
    -
     
  4. Klaus

    Klaus Newbie

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    Complete Rubbish.
     
  5. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    ^^^ would You like to expand Klaus? One-liners are unhelpful and add nothing to the discussion.

    Perhaps You has evidence to prove their statement? If so: Please share.
     
  6. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    OK: Since Klaus isn't biting.

    SWIJ thinks the story is related to these studies:

    Novel sulfasalazine analogues with enhanced NF-kB inhibitory and apoptosis promoting activity 2005

    F. Habens;N. Srinivasan;F. Oakley;D. A. Mann;A. Ganesan;G. Packham
    Abstract

    The NF-kB transcription factor plays a key role in the regulation of apoptosis by modulating expression of a wide range of cell death control molecules. NF-kB also plays an important role in human diseases by promoting inappropriate cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of NF-kB are therefore likely to provide novel therapeutic opportunities. Sulfasalazine (SFZ) is a synthetic anti-inflammatory comprising an aminosalicylate, 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), linked to an antibiotic, sulfapyridine (SPY). SFZ, but not 5-ASA or SPY, inhibits activation of NF-kB. We synthesised a small number of SFZ analogues and determined their ability to inhibit NF-kB activity and promote apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and hepatic stellate cells, where NF-kB plays an important role in cell survival. Remarkably, 3 of the 6 analogues synthesised were significantly more effective (up to 8-fold) inhibitors of NF-kB dependent transcription and this increased activity was associated with enhanced apoptosis. Therefore, it is possible to readily improve the NF-kB inhibiting activity of SFZ and analogues of SFZ may be attractive therapeutic agents for malignancies and chronic liver disease where NF-kB is thought to play a significant role.

    Inhibition of inhibitor of kappaB kinases stimulates hepatic stellate cell apoptosis and accelerated recovery from rat liver fibrosis 2005

    F. Oakley;M. Meso;J. P. Iredale;K. Green;C. J. Marek;X. Zhou;M. J. May;H. Millward-Sadler;M. C. Wright;D. A. Mann
    Abstract

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Resolution of liver fibrosis is associated with clearance of hepatic myofibroblasts by apoptosis; development of strategies that promote this process in a selective way is therefore important. The aim of this study was to determine whether the inhibitor of kappaB kinase suppressor sulfasalazine stimulates hepatic myofibroblast apoptosis and recovery from fibrosis. METHODS: Hepatic myofibroblasts were generated by culture activation of rat and human hepatic stellate cells. Fibrosis was established in rat livers by chronic injury with carbon tetrachloride followed by recovery with or without sulfasalazine (150 mg/kg) treatment. RESULTS: Treatment of hepatic stellate cells with sulfasalazine (0.5-2.0 mmol/L) induced apoptosis of activated rat and human hepatic stellate cells. A single in vivo administration of sulfasalazine promoted accelerated recovery from fibrosis as assessed by improved fibrosis score, selective clearance of smooth muscle alpha-actin-positive myofibroblasts, reduced hepatic procollagen I and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 messenger RNA expression, and increased matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity. Mechanistic studies showed that sulfasalazine selectively blocks nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent gene transcription, inhibits hepatic stellate cell expression of Gadd45beta, stimulates phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase 2, and promotes apoptosis by a mechanism that is prevented by the Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125. As further evidence for a survival role for the inhibitor of kappaB kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB pathway in activated hepatic stellate cells, a highly selective cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of kappaB kinase activation also stimulated hepatic stellate cell apoptosis via a Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: Inhibition of the inhibitor of kappaB kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB pathway is sufficient to increase the rate at which activated hepatic stellate cells undergo apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, and drugs that selectively target inhibitor of kappaB kinase have potential as antifibrotics.

    Now while SWIJ hasn't read the full papers (and to be honest probably wouldn't understand them if she had!) what she gets from the abstracts is that there may be a role in the future for drugs like this.

    SWIJ accepts, however, that these studies are a long way off from "Sulfasalazine cures cirrhosis" (which is what the news article seems to be claiming).
     
  7. The_Hurried_Condor

    The_Hurried_Condor Newbie

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    whilst I know next to nothing about the potential for sulfasalazine to reduce liver scar tissue, I was unfortunate enough to be prescribed it once for a condition (RA) that I live with.

    in SWIM's own, personal experience of this med, he can say that hypersensitivity to it is not a very nice experience, resulting for SWIM in a 24 hour bed session, followed by a trip (excuse pun) to the local A & E department and immediate cessation of treatment.

    symptoms included extreme hot flushes followed by extreme shivering, increased heart rate, massive nausea, total body aches and a very unpleasant general malaise.

    I found returning home and smoking a rather large spliff helped somewhat.


    it might be that I am sensitive to certain meds as I had asimilar experience on cyclosporine (another immunosuppressive).


    in some ways SWIM hopes that sulfasalazine does not turn out to be useful for scarred liver tissue, as if he ever needs it, it won't be something he looks forward to.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2017
  8. Klaus

    Klaus Newbie

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    Sorry Jatelka.
    Swim works in healthcare and has spoken to appropriate doctors and it seems there is no evidence for Sulphasalazine in liver regeneration whatsoever.

    In fact it is associated with a lot of problems.
     
  9. duncdunc68

    duncdunc68 Silver Member

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    I like my scars.
     
  10. Ethyl

    Ethyl Newbie

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    I like all my scars but i don't like the liver scars that i have for having hep c for more than 10 years untreated.

    EDIT: sorry for upping this old thread, but i didn't notice the date, and was searching for hep c liver damage.
     
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