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    PLEASE HELP

Injecting - The big lump after injecting

Discussion in 'Heroin' started by aaronitotheburrito, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. aaronitotheburrito

    aaronitotheburrito Newbie

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    Today some dude was getting shot up by a friend and it was hard to hit this dudes vein. He finally did but once injected a a lump was in his arm. Its really small I has seen this happen to alot of other people way worse
    Its from missing a vein right? Does it eventually get absorbed?
     
  2. Herbal Healer 019

    Herbal Healer 019 Silver Member

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    I did this himself a few tims, it's from going through the vein or missing it alltogether. Basically all the lump is is a subcutaneous injection rather than intravenious because You missed it, so yes it gets absorbed but subcutaneous injection is slightly less bioavailable than IV and comes on slower in addition to stinging like a madafucka.
     
  3. aaronitotheburrito

    aaronitotheburrito Newbie

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    yeah i thought it does.
    swim's lump is almost gone but hes still feeling great from the dose he took 6 hours ago.
     
  4. EyesOfTheWorld

    EyesOfTheWorld Silver Member R.I.P.

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    Still it should be avoided at all costs as it can lead to abcesses, etc.
     
  5. Helene

    Helene Gold Member

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    This isn't strictly true. Missed hits (where IV injection was intended, but the vein was missed) aren't exactly the same as subcutaneous injections. Subcutaneous means "under the skin". When you miss a vein, the heroin solution is left much deeper in your flesh, and ends up sat in the layer of fatty tissues below your skin.

    Medicines designed for subcutaneous or intramuscular injection dissolve completely, leaving nothing left. Heroin does not do this - we all know how much insoluble crap is mixed in with even the "purest" heroin.

    When you inject heroin into a vein, the solution is taken away from the injection site by the blood flow of the vein. All the crap in the cut that has ended up in your hit is filtered by your liver and kidneys. Fair enough, it doesn't do them much good, but it's better than the alternative.

    With subcutaneous skin-popping, intramuscular injection, or missed hits everything you inject is left just sitting there, either under the skin or in the fatty tissue, not going anywhere. All the soluble stuff will be absorbed into you bloodstream eventually, but all the insoluble stuff will just sit there, waiting to get infected. It is then down to the white blood cells (leukocytes) of your body's immune system to attack any bacteria and foreign material, in an attempt prevent an infection developing. In terms of infection risk, it's a very high risk method of injection. In reality, with each hit you are risking developing a serious abscessed infection, but this risk is so much higher with non-IV injections.

    The symptoms of sepsis are detailed below. One or more of these symptoms may be present:

    High fever - increased temperature, dizziness, flushing, sweating, chills, severe shivering or shaking, cold, pale extremities (hands and feet), headache, feeling weak.
    Generalised aches and pains, pain in the joints at your wrists, elbows, back, hips, knees, and ankles, abdominal pain and/or vomiting.
    Hypotension, increased heart rate and/or respiratory rate, decreased blood pressure.
    Less frequent urination, in smaller amounts than usual.
    Haemorrhages or rash on skin - may present as a reddish discoloration or small dark red dots throughout the body.
    Change in mental state - lethargy, confusion, disorientation and/or agitation.

    As sepsis worsens body temperature often falls below normal, and breathing becomes very difficult. The skin may become cool and mottled or blue because blood flow is reduced. Reduced blood flow may cause tissue (including tissue in vital organs), to die, resulting in gangrene. This can lead to limb loss and organ failure. If septic shock develops, blood pressure can remain dangerously low, even despite treatment. Respiratory failure, cardiac failure and organ failure can follow.

    Sepsis and septic shock must be treated immediately with intravenous antibiotics - often even before test results confirm the diagnosis. Any delay in antibiotic treatment greatly decreases the patient's chances of survival. People with symptoms of septicemia or septic shock are immediately admitted to an intensive care unit for treatment. Abscesses will be drained, and after administration of antibiotics, surgery may be required to remove dead tissue.

    Even with treatment, the risk of death can be as much as 15% for people with sepsis and 40% for people with septic shock.

    If you have an abscess (or an infected miss - pretty much the same thing) and you start to display any of the above listed symptoms of serious septic infection, this means that the infection has spread, and you could have septicemia (blood poisoning) or septic shock. If this happens, you must go to the accident and emergency (ER) department of the nearest hospital straight away. If abscesses are left untreated, sepsis and/or toxic shock can cause cellulitis, necrosis of tissue leading to gangrene and limb loss, septicemia, toxic shock, and even death.

    H
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
  6. Hapworth

    Hapworth Newbie

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    Lumps and rashes are par for the course, and if someone is new to the scene, these can be scary at first. In general, lumps and/or rashes should disappear fairly quickly. If they do not, then there is cause for concern.
     
  7. herbalgerbals

    herbalgerbals Newbie

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    if I had these symptoms, but they went away, and its been 2 days, the only symptoms now is very mild tenderness / bruising type pain where the vein is, should I go to the hospital or wait?? the needle was in swims arms for about a minute fishing for blood to ineject, the needle moved around quite a bit, I was thinking it was just irritation??

    swim also did Not use a cotton or any sort of filter, just shot up straight gear.. he got the shakes/shivers headache almost within an hour or two after, that was monday at about 5am, its tueday afternoon now, and all symptoms have gone away except for the slight tenderness / bruising type feeling where the injection sight was..
     
  8. catseye

    catseye Gold Member

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    I personally think it's more likely the typical tenderness/bruising that occasionally occurs when IV'ing.
    As far as the other symptoms go (shivers, headache) that could have been down to the cut...god only knows what street brown can contain :s If the symptoms went away, it's not likely to be septicemia as something that serious won't resolve itself without medical intervention and antibiotics.

    As Hapworth says, it can be scary the first few times injecting...which is a good thing as it will put the clever users like You off injecting ;)

    And just on a harm-reduction note, IV'ers please always use a filter...cotton, or better yet a particle filter/wheel filter - most impurities are invisible to the naked eye but can lodge in veins and travel to organs causing all sorts of havoc. Be safe :vibes:
     
  9. fyouzz

    fyouzz Newbie

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    So a friend of a friend decided to shoot up H today but most of the veins on his left arm were not showing or already screwed up and even though he for the most part knows what he's doing he never learned to hit it left handed(no pun intended) so he asked his another friend to hit his right arm for him. His friend thought he registered but completely missed the shot (about 30cc) and now my FOAF has a good sized bump on his arm, it's closer to your elbow if you put your palm up. My FOAF soaked it in warm water and kept it elevated for the most part, the redness went away but it is still really swollen and sore. I know this topic has been covered a lot but any idea if he should be concerned? It's only been about 4 hours.
     
  10. lvng4wknd

    lvng4wknd Newbie

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    almost 2 days ago i injected adderall and apparantly missed. I did it in my wrist and ankle. My wrist has a small red lump and ankle is very swolen and hurts quite a bit. Having trouble walking. When or should i go to er? I want to avoid that at all cost.

    PLEASE HELP I AM TERRIFIED!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2013
  11. ianzombie

    ianzombie Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Go and get professional help, we are not doctors here and asking the opinion of strangers on the internet is not in anyway a good alternative to getting professional treatment.
    It might be nothing or it might be something serious, either way for peace of mind you need to go to hospital and get yourself examined.
     
  12. berry13

    berry13 Silver Member

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    If it starts to swell/turn red, and feels warmer than the surrounding area, get medical help immediately. This is the start of an absess. If you missed the entire shot, regardless of what I just said, get checked right NOW. You gotta deal with it asap, the sooner it's dealt with the less damaging the outcome will be.

    If you use a lot, think of your major vein that you always hit as a cheese grater. Yeah, it's still a vein, but there's leaks bloody everywhere. You can hit it (and the blood oozes in oh so slow cause the vein is on the verge of collapsing) and not miss a single bit when you're shooting, but as it goes into the vein there can be some oozing out because of that cheese-grater concept I mentioned. Gross, I know, but we stick shit in our bodies here so deal.

    If you get a bump after a partial miss, it's normal. You may or may not get infected, nobody knows. Switch between hot and cold compresses, give it time, and if within 24 hours it's still the same size, medical help is necessary. I've done this maybe 5 times before and was a luckysonofabitch, never got medical help and never got absesses. But I still to this day have calloused veins in the crook of my right arm, you can run a finger over it and it'll feel hard and bumpy. The hard bumps after misses was what scared me the fucking most, cause it's a complete gamble as to how your body will deal with it, and just the chance of it letting it fester and bacteria grow gave me major anxiety.
     
  13. Funkasauras

    Funkasauras Newbie

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    Couple days ago same thing happened but with method. First time on the point in over five years but back then had been a 4 year pincushion. So like so many other peoples, knots become a fairly common occurrence. But this was a little different. As recalled most were right beneath the skin and could be "rubbed out" so to say. This baby is near the bicep and is hard as a rock. Feels more like a pulled muscle than anything. At first was beginning to think the tieoff was to tight but then the hard knot was noticed. Since it seems to be dulling in pain anyway and swelling is slowly subsiding; will this absorb with these heat packs? Thanks for any help and hope the best for all the rest of my new friends here

    Funkasauras added 1 Minutes and 20 Seconds later...

    Couple days ago same thing happened but with meth. First time on the point in over five years but back then had been a 4 year pincushion. So like so many other peoples, knots become a fairly common occurrence. But this was a little different. As recalled most were right beneath the skin and could be "rubbed out" so to say. This baby is near the bicep and is hard as a rock. Feels more like a pulled muscle than anything. At first was beginning to think the tieoff was to tight but then the hard knot was noticed. Since it seems to be dulling in pain anyway and swelling is slowly subsiding; will this absorb with these heat packs? Thanks for any help and hope the best for all the rest of my new friends here
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  14. pete doherty

    pete doherty Newbie

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    This happens to me a lot, i think the needle lenth i use i to long as i have to come right back out before i start to draw blood back, and then inverabley as i pull the plunger down the needlw goes back in and i end upwith a golf ball on my arm. most annoying. it still works but is a slow release.
     
  15. Breezey55

    Breezey55 Newbie

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    I've had lumps after missing that take days to go away. Does this happen to anyone else? Most of the posts I am reading say their lumps disappear within 30 min to 1 hour. This is not the case with me but I haven't had any problems so far. Just curious...
     
  16. YoungNDruggedUp

    YoungNDruggedUp Newbie

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    Whatever you do, do not listen to black mamba and extract an abcess yourself, this heightens your risk of a blood infection tremendously and won't get rid of your abcess
     
  17. Blackmamba76

    Blackmamba76 Newbie

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    How much would it cost an average ballpark figure to go to A&E and have a Abcess like this treated? Including after care medication antibiotics ex? If you didn't have insurance?
     
  18. Phenoxide

    Phenoxide Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Less than it'd cost to treat a systemic infection, necrotic ulcer, or fasciitis that could develop if an abscess is allowed to fester. The earlier an abscess is examined and treated by a medical professional, the better.
     
  19. ianzombie

    ianzombie Platinum Member & Advisor

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    And are you willing to lay the costs of all the OP's medical bills on it if it does not work for them?
    You do realise that just because something worked once for one person it does not mean it is a good idea, right?

    Maybe you will live with yourself if they were to get a nasty infection, maybe even lose their arm, but if you are going to tell people that doing something is in their best interest (better than going to a doctor to get professional treatment) then you might as well back up your claim and state 'satisfaction guaranteed or all medical expenses covered'

    I have no idea.
    But i imagine it would be better to be out of pocket than without an arm.
     
  20. Sniper4dayz

    Sniper4dayz Mercury Member

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    That's happened to my friend a few times. I always thought, based on observation, he was just injecting the liquid to quick, traumatizing the vein. Goes away within a few hours...