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Drug info - The Oxazepam Metathread

Discussion in 'Benzodiazepines' started by allyourbase, Mar 18, 2005.

  1. allyourbase

    allyourbase Palladium Member

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    very light benzo in red capsules. one subject tried snorting three and was gifted with a very very nice buzz for around four hours, whats interesting about these is that I do believe they are still "unscheduled" or available across state and international lines without a perscription.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 11, 2012
  2. Benzhead

    Benzhead Titanium Member

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    Are you sure about the spelling?


    If it is Oxazepam..which in 15mg capsules by Purepac are light red, this is a schedule IV in the U.S. The cap. should contain the identifier: R069 in black print(very small).


    Additionally, Purepac also markets a 30mg Oxazepam capsule that is deeper red in color, and has the identifier: R073 in a medium grey print. It goes without saying that this too is a schedule IV drug.


    Nearly all benzodiazepines are schedule IV substances under the CSA(Controlled Substances Act) with the exception of Flunitrazepam(Rohypnol) which is a schedule I drug in some states, as well as having stiffer federal penalties for 'trafficking' than the other fifteen or so benzos legally marketed benzodiazepinesin the U.S.


    Depsite it's sinister reputation, Rohypnol remains a CSA schedule IV substance despite its not being legally marketed(prescribed) in the U.S.


    Sorry about the post length. I hope that this makes the scheduling of benzodiadepines in the U.S. clearer.
     
  3. QGdoxl

    QGdoxl Gold Member

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    I was perscribed these for sleeping pills and I found no rec value outta them really other than to help sleep
     
  4. kavakava

    kavakava Newbie

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    I received a pack of oxazepam 50 mg. Is that any good? For anxiety I mean
     
  5. allyourbase

    allyourbase Palladium Member

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    lmao. yes. although Ive never seen the 50 mg pills, I used to get 90 a month of the 15 mg red caps. you shouldnt need more than one if theyre really 50 mg, I never needed more than three of the reds.
     
  6. said

    said Newbie

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    I must agree with allyourbase,never seen 50mg but 3 or 4 30mg tabs kicks it.All depends on your tolerance.[​IMG]
     
  7. presence

    presence Newbie

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    Oxazepam totally rules. They make you fell mellow and cool.
     
  8. SkUnKaDeLiC

    SkUnKaDeLiC Newbie

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    Oxazepam: good or bad? --



    Well, they are the shortest acting benzo there is.. every other benzo
    that you take gets converted by your metabolism into oxazepam anyway
    ... so you may as well take the pure form. BUT - oxazepam is very short
    lasting , much like xanax.
     
  9. HandyMan81

    HandyMan81 Titanium Member

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    Oxazepam??

    I got this prescribed from my doctor, now my question is: is this any good and are there ways to extend or even enhance the feeling? thnx
     
  10. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Oxazepam is a short acting benzo, usually prescribed for anxiety or alcohol withdrawal. As with other short acting benzo's it has significant recreational (and therefore abuse) potential. It takes 20-30mins to kick in when taken orally. Main effects are relief of anxiety/feeling of calm. Max peak of effects is about 3 hours at about 6 hours you'll be feeling back to baseline, friends of hers have reported signicant rebound worsening of their mood towards end of dose.

    As with any benzo other sedative drugs including alcohol will have an additive sedative effect (benzo's + alcohol should generally be regarded as bad news).

    Remember that just 2 weeks of daily use can build up tolerance to any benzo (and the short-acting drugs are significantly problematic for addiction).
     
  11. calmascanbe

    calmascanbe Newbie

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    jatelka-If you know a little more ,would you mind letting us know more about oxazepam?
     
  12. HandyMan81

    HandyMan81 Titanium Member

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    Important!

    Shall i make a info thread for Oxazepam?
     
  13. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Some stuff pulled off the web:

    Oxazepam is the first of a chemically new series of compounds, the 3-hydroxybenzodiazepinones. A new therapeutic agent providing versatility and flexibility in control of common emotional disturbances, this product exerts prompt action in a wide variety of disorders associated with anxiety, tension, agitation, and irritability, and anxiety associated with depression. In tolerance and toxicity studies on several animal species, this product reveals significantly greater safety factors than related compounds (chlordiazepoxide and diazepam) and manifests a wide separation of effective doses and doses inducing side effects.

    Oxazepam capsules contain 10 mg, 15 mg or 30 mg oxazepam. The following inactive ingredients are contained in these capsules: corn starch, croscarmellose sodium, FD&C Red #40, gelatin, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose (monohydrate), magnesium stearate, methylparaben, propylparaben, sodium lauryl sulfate, titanium dioxide, and other inert ingredients. The 10 mg capsule also contains D&C Red #28. The 15 mg capsule also contains D&C Yellow #10. The 30 mg capsule also contains D&C Red #28 and FD&C Blue #1.

    Oxazepam is 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. A white crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 286.72 and the following molecular formula C15H11ClN2O2.


    CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

    Pharmacokinetic testing in healthy adult subjects has demonstrated that a single 30 mg dose of a capsule will result in equivalent extent of absorption. Peak plasma levels were observed to occur about 3 hours after dosing. The mean elimination half-life for oxazepam was approximately 8.2 hours (range 5.7 to 10.9 hours).

    This product has a single, major inactive metabolite in man, a glucuronide excreted in urine.

    ANIMAL PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

    In mice, Oxazepam exerts an anticonvulsant (anti-MetrazoI®) activity at 50-percent- effective doses of about 0.6 mg/kg orally. (Such anticonvulsant activity of benzodiazepines correlates with their tranquilizing properties.) To produce ataxia (rotabar test) and sedation (abolition of spontaneous motor activity), the 50-percent-effective doses of this product are greater than 5 mg/kg orally. Thus, about ten times the therapeutic (anticonvulsant) dose must be given before ataxia ensues, indicating a wide separation of effective doses and doses inducing side effects.

    In evaluation of antianxiety of compounds, conflict behavioral tests in rats differentiate continuous response for food in the presence of anxiety-provoking stress (shock) from drug-induced motor incoordination. This product shows significant separation of doses required to relieve anxiety and doses producing sedation or ataxia. Ataxia-producing doses exceed those of related CNS-acting drugs.

    Indications

    Oxazepam is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety or tension associated with the stress of everyday life usually does not require treatment with an anxiolytic.

    Anxiety associated with depression is also responsive to Oxazepam therapy.

    This product has been found particularly useful in the management of anxiety, tension, agitation, and irritability in older patients.

    Alcoholics with acute tremulousness, inebriation, or with anxiety, associated with alcohol withdrawal are responsive to therapy.

    The effectiveness of Oxazepam in long-term use, that is, more than 4 months, has not been assessed by systematic clinical studies. The physician should periodically reassess the usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.


    DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

    Because of the flexibility of this product and the range of emotional disturbances responsive to it, dosage should be individualized for maximum beneficial effects.

    USUAL DOSE

    Mild-to-moderate anxiety, with associated tension, irritability, agitation, or related symptoms of functional origin or secondary to organic disease. 10 to 15 mg, 3 or 4 times daily
    Severe anxiety syndromes, agitation, or anxiety associated with depression. 15 to 30 mg, 3 or 4 times daily
    Older patients with anxiety, tension, irritability, and agitation. Initial dosage: 10 mg, 3 times daily. If necessary, increase cautiously to 15 mg, 3 or 4 times daily.
    Alcoholics with acute inebriation, tremulousness, or anxiety on withdrawal. 15 to 30 mg, 3 or 4 times daily


    SIDE EFFECTS

    The necessity for discontinuation of therapy due to undesirable effects has been rare. Transient, mild drowsiness is commonly seen in the first few days of therapy. If it persists, the dosage should be reduced. In few instances, dizziness, vertigo, headache, and rarely syncope have occurred either alone or together with drowsiness. Mild paradoxical reactions, i.e., excitement, stimulation of affect, have been reported in psychiatric patients; these reactions may be secondary to relief of anxiety and usually appear in the first two weeks of therapy.

    Other side effects occurring during oxazepam therapy include rare instances of minor diffuse skin rashes - morbilliform, urticarial, and maculopapular - nausea, lethargy, edema, slurred speech, tremor, and altered libido. Such side effects have been infrequent and are generally controlled with reduction of dosage.

    Although rare, leukopenia and hepatic dysfunction including jaundice have been reported during therapy. Periodic blood counts and liver-function tests are advisable.

    Ataxia with oxazepam has been reported in rare instances and does not appear to be specifically related to dose or age.

    Although the following side reactions have not as yet been reported with oxazepam, they have occurred with related compounds (chlordiazepoxide and diazepam): paradoxical excitation with severe rage reactions, hallucinations, menstrual irregularities, change in EEG pattern, blood dyscrasias including agranulocytosis, blurred vision, diplopia, incontinence, stupor, disorientation, fever, and euphoria.

    One of the most interesting things is that there seems to be lots of conflicting info out there about the abuse potential of Oxazepam: Loads of places say it's high abuse potential because of short duration of action, and then (equally reputable) other places say it has low abuse potential because it crosses the blood-brain barrier relatively slowly.

    SWIM hasn't got time to look into it at the moment: But watch this space!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2006
  14. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    OK: So SWIM was intrigued about the conflicting info...

    Here's an abstract that's fairly clear:

    Comparison of diazepam and oxazepam:
    preference, liking and extent of abuse
    by
    Griffiths RR, McLeod DR, Bigelow GE,
    Liebson IA, Roache JD, Nowowieski P.
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1984 May;229(2):501-8

    ABSTRACT
    In a residential hospital research ward setting, the effects of and preference for placebo, oxazepam (480 mg) and diazepam (40, 80 and 160 mg) were studied in human volunteers with histories of sedative drug abuse. Doses p.o. were administered every 3rd day under double-blind conditions. After an initial exposure to the letter-coded test drugs, a series of choice days was scheduled on which subjects chose between two available drug alternatives. Compared with oxazepam, diazepam produced greater liking (area under the time-action curve), peak liking and euphoria and was judged to be of greater monetary street value. Diazepam was categorized as producing barbiturate-like subjective effects more frequently than was oxazepam (54 vs. 21%), whereas oxazepam was identified as placebo more often than diazepam (32 vs. 4%). Diazepam was associated with a more rapid onset of effect than was oxazepam, and this rapid onset was repeatedly cited by subjects in poststudy written comments as being a desirable feature of the drug effect. In choice tests, 80 and 160 mg of diazepam were preferred to 480 mg of oxazepam on 62.5 and 91.7% of the choice tests, respectively. In choice tests between placebo and drug, placebo was never preferred to diazepam; however, placebo was preferred to oxazepam on 21.4% of choice tests. Overall, these results extend previous experimental observations suggesting that diazepam has a higher abuse liability than oxazepam. The results are also compatible with an analysis of epidemiological data showing that diazepam abuse uniformly exceeds oxazepam abuse on seven epidemiological measures of drug abuse.

    It seems that although oxazepam is a relatively short-acting drug (which would normally make for high abuse potential) it's absorption times are longer than diazepam, alprazolam etc. It's generally therefore regarded as a "low potency" benzodiazepine. Whether this means it's also not that great recreationally?
     
  15. calmascanbe

    calmascanbe Newbie

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    jatelka- Thanks for all the info.
     
  16. mark_v

    mark_v Newbie

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    Swim tried the 50 mg's Oxazepam a few times.
    Nice, mellow feeling, a bit like Lorazepam.
    100 mg gave swim a good night of sleep.
     
  17. dr ACE

    dr ACE Titanium Member

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    oxazepam/prazepam?

    does anyone know anything about these benzos swim just picked up the names somewhere but swim dont know anything about them anti-anxiety maybe?:-oxazepam [e.g., Serax], prazepam [e.g., Centrax]
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2009
  18. mark_v

    mark_v Newbie

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    Swim has some experience with 10 mg and 50 mg Oxazepam pills.
    Found them very similar to Ativan (lorazepam) and worked great for anxiety in a 'lower' dose (10- 30 mg) and in a 'higher' dose (50 -100 mg) they acted like a good sleeping aid.
     
  19. Sloop

    Sloop Newbie

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    Oxazepam useful for stumulant comedowns?

    Hello all,
    Swim wrote a thread in the coke forum a few weeks back asking about the usefulness of oxacepam for coming down off stimulants (mostly coke and rarely MDMA in swims case). So far nobody has given any first hand info if oxacepam is okay used in this way. swim is a little scared of added strain on the heart etc though my heart is fine, but wondered if this oxacepam is contraindicated with stimulant comedowns as everybody seems to stick with xanax and valium that swim has read about in the forums, and grass which doesnt react well in swim anymore unfortunately.

    Its now hard for swim to get xanax which swim has found good for this come down purpose. Swim is stuck with 25 tablets of 30 mg oxacepam and worried if it is the right spanner in swims travel tool kit as swim is soon to get on a flight to south america and in the past on that fine continent inevitably some snow has found its way into swims nose (usually 2 times a week).

    Swim hopes swim is not annoying dedicated downer only users with this drug combo question but any info on the dos and donts of combining with oxacepam and if it is any different from the other benzos in this regard is much appreciated as it is an entirely new drug for swim
     
  20. Jatelka

    Jatelka Psychedelic Shepherdess Platinum Member & Advisor

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    Theoretically ANY benzo can be used for stimulant come downs. Oxazepam is a relatively short acting drug that it mainly used for anxiety, although members have also used it for sleep

    If SWIS is benzo naive SWIJ would suggest using quarter to half a 30mg pill and seeing how SWIS goes (IF she was going to suggest taking another drug to counteract the effects of a first, which she doesn't really think is wise).

    Bear in mind that benzo use often "creeps". Certainly there was a point in SWIJ's life where benzos were (initially) used in escalating doses to help with stimulant comedowns, and then they were around in the house anyway and she thought "Well, why not?"... And then she found she was doing them pretty much every day.. And that way lies trouble.

    Benzos also have a disinhibiting effect: It can be very easy to end up taking more than SWIY might have planned.

    Mixing Benzos with alcohol (or other downers) is definitely NOT recommended: Additive risk of respiratory depression.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2009