1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
    Dismiss Notice

USA - US Senator wants ban on drug-like bath salts

Discussion in 'Justice & Law' started by Terrapinzflyer, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Terrapinzflyer

    Terrapinzflyer MDMA, RC & News Forums Platinum Member & Advisor

    Reputation Points:
    5,657
    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Messages:
    7,610
    Male from U.S.A.
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York says he wants the federal government to ban new designer drugs known as bath salts that pack as much punch as cocaine or methamphetamines.

    The small, inexpensive packets of powder are meant to be snorted for a hallucination-inducing high, but they are often marketed with a wink on the Internet or in convenience stores as bathing salts.

    The Democratic senator is announcing a bill Sunday that would add those chemicals to the list of federally controlled substances. He is also pushing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban the substance in the state.

    A handful of states have already banned the active ingredients in the powders.

    Schumer says the bath salts "contain ingredients that are nothing more than legally sanctioned narcotics."


    The Associated Press
    Sunday, January 30, 2011; 7:15 AM

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/30/AR2011013001241.html


    COMMENT: this is interesting as the DEA has essentially said they don't have the data yet to move forward on emergency scheduling these substances. Politicians on the other hand, can do as they damn well please.