Legal - Utah's attempt at banning kratom & problems buying kratom

Discussion in 'Kratom' started by Araushnee, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Araushnee

    Araushnee Silver Member

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    Update:
    I am changing this post for SWIM. It doesn't actually look like Utah plans to ban kratom anymore. But I will still leave what I found on a news site, and expressed concern.

    Original:

    I found this on kratomfact.info/news:

    "Feb 13, 2011 - There is a bill before the legislature in Utah that intends to ban a number of substances including kratom, spice, and "bath salts". Kratom is not the primary target of this bill, but once again, is being lumped together with other substances in a rush to ban them. This bill seems to be in flux as lawmakers argue about what exactly should be banned. The text can be found here: removed link. Let your voice be heard on this issue. Call or write the bill sponsor: removed contact info"




    Also when I went to go buy kratom today, the vendor no longer had debit/credit as an available payment, only COD and mail order. SWIM contacted the vendor. The vendor said their merchent processor dropped them without warning 2 weeks ago, that they can no longer provide services for "incence" vendors.

    I would like to now if other states are trying to ban, there is very little news about this due to the fact some are recent developments.
    So far I have heard nothing from her state in VA, but that doesn't mean anything.

    I am mega upset. SWIM only found this wonderful plant less then a year ago.

    Edit: It came to SWIM's attention that the info is from last February and not this February, but still I don't know what the deal is with this and would appreciate input as to what is happening here. Maybe it is a good sign that SWIM can't find information.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
    1. 3/5,
      Great food for thought and discussion!
      Feb 19, 2012
  2. Morrigan_la_Fey

    Morrigan_la_Fey Silver Member

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    Re: Utah trying to ban like Louisana & problems buying kratom

    I've long been of the belief that no good deed goes unpunished (I'm sure I didn't make that one up on my own) and no awesome substance escapes the eye of Big Brother. Kratom is probably, unfortunately, no exception. I have only been aware of it, and using it somewhat regularly and with huge success, for a little over a year herself, but has said often (like every time she brews) that it's amazeballs that there is no regulation on something so effective. Indeed, it's the one single time that something touted to SWIM as a viable alternative to prescription opiates has not only met, but exceeded, expectations.

    It was pointed out in another thread in this section (forgive me, I don't recall the username) that any time rogue distributors out for a quick buck start doing things like pressing "pills" and selling them at a ridiculous markup, it puts the entire community of aficionados at risk for kratom becoming illegal or controlled, and this would appear to be correct. I recently had a vendor brought to her attention who is marketing "the original kratom tablet" at some exorbitant price. Crap like that, coupled with things like shots resembling energy drinks but with a name that strongly suggests a popular prescription opiate, and the first kid that throws up at the dinner table is going to set off alarm bells and wreck a good thing for the majority of responsible consumers. SWIM's state is NY, and so far there hasn't been any sign of banning, but that's probably because the attorney general here is busy with his doctor database and trying to get our medical records on the interwebs for easy access.
     
  3. Araushnee

    Araushnee Silver Member

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    Re: Utah trying to ban like Louisana & problems buying kratom

    I have an update. I was in another forum asking about this and supposedly the ban did not go through. SWIM also found an article that does support this on a vendor site. SWIM also remembers something about Massachusetts trying to ban kratom.

    I will keep digging the web for some info. It would be interesting to know why the bans never happened and why the Louisiana ban seems to be a bigger deal. I am guessing it wasn't till this past summer that kratom started getting a lot of attention in the media.

    I will change the topic, since I have found evidence that kratom probably isn't on the agenda to be banned anymore in Utah.
     
    1. 3/5,
      Thanks for the update. It's still disturbing.
      Feb 20, 2012
  4. ThunderCloud

    ThunderCloud Silver Member

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    Florida already has Kratom Rehabilitaion programs...in Texas, parents are going crazy because high school kids are trying it, and abusing it. It all stems from people wanting to use Kratom as a drug, rather than for its true medicinal properties. Abuse is the key factor behind these problems. Its disturbing to see politicians and parents (who basically run america's thought process) look ONLY at the negative aspects, even if the positives out-weigh them. We're turning into Nazi Germany...
     
  5. rawbeer

    rawbeer Gold Member

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    http://www.cityweekly.net/utah/article-77-13632-vice-squad.html





    Vice Squad

    A controlled-substances committee is out to fight spice, bath salts and bad drug policy.

    By Eric S. Peterson

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]Photo by Erik Daenitz
    Posted // April 6,2011 - For a legislative committee charged with regulating designer drugs such as marijuana-like concoctions and bath salts laced with amphetamine-related chemicals, the Controlled Substance Advisory Committee surprisingly doesn’t say “no” to all designer drugs. “I’m conservative in the sense that I think there’s a limited role for government—including regulating drugs,” says committee chair and former Utah Health Department Director David Sundwall. “It’s a two-way street determining what should be regulated and what should not be regulated,” Sundwall says. “This [committee] just recognizes that there is an ever-changing menu of fun drugs out there.”
    Created in 2010, the committee has already helped craft the 2011 Legislature’s recent spice and bath salts ban, while rejecting other calls for drug prohibitions that didn’t make sense. Staffed with doctors, a dentist, a naturopathic physician, a member of the Utah Attorney General’s Office and others, the committee has become a clearing house for the Legislature to keep up with the latest designer drug evolutions.
    Rep. Paul Ray, R-Clearfield, still remembers the phone call that motivated him to create the committee. He had sponsored legislation in the 2010 session to outlaw Salvia divinorum, an herb with mild psychedelic qualities. When legislative staffers asked which class of controlled substance Ray wanted the herb classified as, he realized he didn’t have the medical expertise to make that decision.
    “I realized this is not the way to do this,” Ray says. “I withdrew the bill and put one out to create the advisory council that can take a nonpolitical look at these drugs and get away from emotional, knee-jerk reactions.” With that in mind, Ray specifically drafted the composition of the committee to exclude legislators.
    Ironically, the committee recommended that salvia not be classified as a controlled substance since it was not commonly used in Utah, nor did research show its effects to be especially harmful. In the 2011 session, the committee also tabled a bill sponsored by Rep. Chris Herrod, R-Provo, that would have listed kratom, an obscure leaf from South East Asia that had traditionally been chewed for a caffeine-like stimulus, as a controlled substance.
    In 2011, the committee was instrumental in banning spice, the synthetic marijuana “incense” that had recently become popular in local tobacco shops. The committee fine- tuned the bill to outlaw the spice chemicals, but not list them as controlled substances, which makes it easier for researchers to study the chemical structure of spice.
    At a March 31 meeting, the committee heard a report from a representative of the Utah Department of Public Safety stating that in March alone her department had collected 32 samples of spice, 18 of which were analogue varieties or included analogue strains—ones she says prosecutors are uncomfortable charging since they’re not specifically outlawed in statute.
    The committee is hoping the Legislature will study giving them the power to temporarily ban such analogues pending a final say during the legislative session—thus keeping “clever scientists” from just reshelving store supplies with new spice brand variations. “They’re very creative and quick to profit off these changes,” Sundwall says. “It’s like squeezing a balloon—you take care of one thing, and it pops out somewhere else.”
    Glen Hanson, the committee’s pharmacologist and former director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Washington, D.C., worries about people’s assumptions that spice is just legal marijuana. He says the untested substances—often manufactured in China—are marketed to deceive consumers.
    “A new strategy they use is they tell you what’s not in them,” Hanson says, referring to packages that defend their legality by listing the outlawed chemicals as not being in the product—but not listing the chemicals that are in them whose side effects are largely unknown to researchers. Hanson notes some spice brands include chemicals that actually block cannabinoid receptors and bring users down more than get them high. “[They] can cause depression, and in rare cases, are associated with suicidal tendencies,” Hanson says.
    The committee is hoping that the ability to make temporary bans will allow law enforcement to truly take the products off of the shelves. But in the meantime, they are busy studying the latest in designer-drug trends so members can give legislators recommendations based on scientific research.
    “We think its bad policy [that] every time a recreational medicine comes along [we] make it illegal,” Sundwall says. “That’s a bit of a fascist state, in my mind. You want to be prudent in what you regulate.”



    (I just found this article and thought it was pretty uplifting to here that intelligent professionals are being consulted in these matters. Hopefully other states will follow suit and kratom will remain legal.)
     
    1. 3/5,
      interesting and enlightening article, thanks
      Feb 21, 2012
  6. DiabolicScheme

    DiabolicScheme Titanium Member

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    Research chemicals and herbal mixes seem to be the target right now, my heart sunk when i first read this glad to see that it didn't pass.

    Unfortunately i still feel its only a matter of time before kratom is on the chopping block of the DEA.
     
  7. Araushnee

    Araushnee Silver Member

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    Thank you all for the information!

    I have an update.

    Kratom is no longer going to be banned for anyone over the age of 18 in Louisiana.
    I cannot post links, but both the petition site and kratom association have confirmed this.

    This is good news, and not just for Kratom, but the fact is we do have an impact on what the government decides. Don't lose hope and think you cannot make a difference. 500 people just made a difference. And with more states deciding not to ban kratom, that decision will way on further attempts by other states.

    These are quotes from the Kratom association:


    We have received a confirmation from the Senator. The original kratom ban plans are from the table. In stead senator Crowe will file a new plan that will focus on setting an age limit for kratom. Buyers would need to be 18 yrs old and sellers cannot sell their products to youngsters.

    I quote from one of his emails.
    " Our concern has always been to protect our youth 18 and under from the abuse and misuse which has become a reality in our state. The new bill replaces SB73 and will meet this objective"

    I think we can all respect and understand this and I propose that we do indeed check our sellers to see if they have measures in place to meet these age limits.

    A copy of the new bill is here: link removed
     
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