Why Can We Not Just Do What We Want?

Discussion in 'Drug Policy Reform & Narco Politics' started by Seraph, Jun 22, 2012.

  1. Seraph

    Seraph Silver Member

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    I was thinking about the laws regarding drugs and I was thinking about the fact that I am prescribed dihydrocodeine for pain, if the doctors can trust me with dihydrocodeine then why I am I not allowed to choose which painkiller I want? Why can I not be prescribed oxymorphone ampoules with needles?

    The drug war supporters usually state some horrific scenarios that will happen if people stop getting punished for using drugs that the government do not allow but what do drug war supporters think would happen if I was prescribed oxymorphone ampoules with needles to be used as needed for pain and depression? Do they think I would completely lose my mind and kill people at random for my own amusement or some other dramatic, horrific scenario even though I have been prescribed dihydrocodeine without ever becoming addicted to it or having any problems with it?

    What is the average drug war supporter's argument for not allowing drugs to be prescribed that people want even if the person who is prescribed a certain drug is much better in many ways with that drug than without it? Why could people who smoke cannabis for depression not be prescribed cannabis for the treatment of depression for example?
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2012
  2. SpatialReason

    SpatialReason Palladium Member

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    The short and sweet reply: the moral majority need to finish getting cancer and dying. Eventually the younger generation can enjoy a fat blunt after burying all of them... the old foolish opinions will die hopefully with their perpetrators and we may, someday, get a form of "controlled freedom."

    ... or the nanny states continue to rise and people will eventually collapse their jail system.
     
  3. Trancel0v3r

    Trancel0v3r Titanium Member

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    I think the examples of addiction stories on here are enough of a reason why governments and doctors dont want people taking strong addictive chemicals at their own free will. Drugs are tested very extensively and cannabis use for depression for example simply doesnt stack up to the newer SSRI's and suchlike. Sure it has its medicinal use, but dont you think that if it were effective enough then it would be dispensed as such? Take heroin for example. It is first and foremost a medicine. But the abuse potential is so high its use is extremely restricted. If you were given oxymorphone and needles, its a serious addiction for the rest of your life waiting to happen, which is exactly the reverse of what the medical community want. Their main aim is to look after YOUR health and I dont think that would be the way to do it. OK so YOU may not have problems with taking dihydro, but many other people do, and for that reason theres a blanket ban on it being sold and also why its (and other prescription drugs with recreational potential) dispensed only when you really need it.
     
  4. SpatialReason

    SpatialReason Palladium Member

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    I was solely on a platform of recreational drugs myself and not medical opiate nightmares.

    Those need to stay in the hands of the medical community.
     
  5. Grimace

    Grimace Titanium Member

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    The younger generation was saying that back in the 1960's too. Then when they got older many of them became today's authoritarians. Sort of like the way kids say they will never turn out like their parents, but most do.

    Based on history, that scenario seems to be the most likely. Heck, we're already in a multi-trillion dollar hole of impossible debt and our "lawmakers" and bureaucrats make more regulations every year. When you keep pressing the accellerator down, the only way to stop is crashing into something.
     
  6. [tanarilla.]

    [tanarilla.] Silver Member

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    I think you're missing the point...you get what you need in terms of prescriptions, and not what you want. It has nothing to do with what an individual can be trusted with...you are not getting oxymorphone because your condition doesn't call for it. Not because they think you are going to go on a naked rampage.
     
  7. Routemaster Flash

    Routemaster Flash Palladium Member

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    Because the stronger the painkiller you're given, the greater the euphoria it will provide and so the greater the chances of you misusing the drug getting addicted to it. Obviously.

    Prescribing opioids for depression would be a terrible idea because there's nothing quite like using a drug as an emotional crutch for encouraging dependence on it. And your depression would be compounded by the misery of withdrawals when you finally try to stop using or if for whatever reason your supply was withdrawn.

    I know the drugs currently used as antidepressants are not without problems of their own but there is a good reason doctors don't simply prescribe drugs that provide euphoria when treating patients with depression.

    Routemaster Flash added 4 Minutes and 12 Seconds later...

    Also, "Why could people who smoke cannabis for depression not be prescribed cannabis for the treatment of depression?" is a ridiculous argument. People do not always act in their own best interest, do they? Most people are not trained professionals in psychiatric health or pharmacology. Some people drink because they're depressed - is that a good reason to prescribe vodka for anyone who's feeling a bit miserable? Of course not.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2012
  8. scartissue_68

    scartissue_68 Palladium Member

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    OK. Some believe the doctors know best. Some haven't dealt with trauma, surgeries and pain management for 40 years.

    The truth is and the reason you can't get what you want is the AMA. It is the second biggest Lobbyist in the US over the past 12 years. They have spent over $269,507,500 in the effort to manipulate laws concerning medications and methodologies to retain their power over us poor uninformed reprobates.

    Don't get me wrong. Doctors have saved my life and limbs, helped me with pain management and generally have patient care as their top priority, but they are never going to give up their prescription pads. That's where the money is.

    Imagine if you could just go to the pharmacy and buy what ever you wanted...much like a liqueur store. Besides immediately stopping the criminals, narco-terrorists, human toll of damage due to drug purity issues for street drugs, putting police back on violent crime interdiction and cleaning up some of the national debt with taxation of this new giant booming business, there would also be far less need for general practice doctors. Those current PCP's would become addiction specialists or provide practical medical services like check ups, mole removals.etc, but doctors would lose their power over us currently guaranteed by law under The Controlled Substance Act. PCP's would still be needed, but they would only make suggestions for proper medications. Right now you have two choices. Get your script filled as written or tear it up and go home.

    Drug companies like the current system, too. Having Law Enforcement (DEA) helping control the supply of drugs, holds costs higher than common laws of economics would indicate logical. Most opiates are actually very cheap to make. But, pharmaceutical companies aren't the story, it's the doctors. That M.D. following their name, means a large percentage of the PCP business is writing prescriptions called medicine.

    This story of Drugs, laws and prescriptions started back in 1903. From hysteria created by WH Hurst in his newspapers, to racially based control systems, to unobtainable tax stamps, it hasn't always been the doctors who have been driving the "Drugs are OUR Job" bus. It was the Controlled Substance Act that did that trick.

    But, that's where we are and that's the answer to your question...."why can't I".

    scartissue_68 added 13 Minutes and 42 Seconds later...

    RMF - While I agree that opiates for depression is a bit off the chart, you are wrong about the generalization that stronger painkillers provide higher degrees of Euphoria. Fentanyl and Buprenorphine are both much stronger by weight than oxymorphone, but neither are sought for their superior euphoria. I'm sure there are more examples, but there is no equation of euphoria to strength of pain relief with opiates. It is a generally assumed truth with more positive than negative examples, but not completely accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2012
  9. Routemaster Flash

    Routemaster Flash Palladium Member

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    OK, I should clarify: by 'stronger' I didn't mean in terms of weight-for-weight potency. I know that fentanyl is, by this measure, many times stronger than e.g. morphine or heroin. What I meant was, the more subjectively intense the analgesic/euphoric effects of a painkiller, the greater the risk of a user becoming psychologically and hence physiologically addicted, surely? Also the OP specifically mentioned IV oxymorphone vs. DHC, and while I'm not a doctor or a pharmacist I should imagine the former would be considerably more euphoric than the latter (as well as, obviously, many times stronger in mg-for-mg terms).

    I'm not saying doctors *always* know best and I'm aware of the arguments regarding the pharmaceutical lobby*. I'm just saying there is probably also a legitimate medical reason why we can't get a script for IV oxymorphone every time we twist our ankle or have a headache.

    (*And on this point: surely if the pharma lobby could have us taking strong pain meds all the time, they'd they'd be in seventh heaven? And doctors - unscrupulous ones, anyway - would still get their cut as long as prescriptions were needed for these drugs.)

    Routemaster Flash added 1126 Minutes and 2 Seconds later...

    I mean, surely it's not a coincidence that heroin is both a lot more fun than codeine and a lot more addictive. Which is why heroin is a tightly controlled drug that people produce, traffic, sell and use at huge personal risk, while codeine is a commonly available OTC painkiller.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2012